Tuesday, August 20, 2019

FDA Approves Wakix (pitolisant), a First-in-Class Medication for the Treatment of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Adult Patients with Narcolepsy


Pitolisant.png
Harmony Biosciences, LLC (Harmony) announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Wakix (pitolisant) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in adult patients with narcolepsy. Wakix is the first and only treatment approved for patients with narcolepsy that is not scheduled as a controlled substance by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).
“We are extremely proud to bring Wakix to market for those living with narcolepsy, a chronic, debilitating, rare neurologic disorder,” said Harmony’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, John C. Jacobs. “At Harmony we share a vision to develop novel treatment options for people living with rare diseases, with a focus on those that affect the central nervous system. The approval of Wakix strengthens our commitment to making that vision a reality.”
Wakix, a first-in-class medication, is a selective histamine 3 (H₃) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist that works through a novel mechanism of action to increase the synthesis and release of histamine, a wake-promoting neurotransmitter in the brain. Wakix is administered orally once daily in the morning upon wakening.
“The approval of Wakix provides healthcare professionals managing people living with narcolepsy a new and important treatment option for their patients,” said Harmony’s Chief Medical Officer, Jeffrey Dayno, M.D. “Additionally, Wakix is the only non-scheduled treatment option approved for adult patients with narcolepsy, and it offers an important benefit/risk profile to address the unmet medical need that exists in people living with narcolepsy.”
The efficacy of Wakix for the treatment of EDS in adult patients with narcolepsy was evaluated in two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies (HARMONY 1 and HARMONY 1bis). These studies included a total of 261 patients who were randomized to receive Wakix, placebo, or active control; these patients had a median age of 37 (HARMONY 1) and 40 (HARMONY 1bis). Treatment duration was eight weeks, with a three-week dose titration phase followed by a 5-week stable dose phase; 75% to 80% of the patients in these studies had a history of cataplexy. In both of these studies, WAKIX demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in EDS as measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score. In the placebo-controlled trials conducted in patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy, the most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥5% of patients and at twice the rate of placebo) with the use of WAKIX were insomnia (6%), nausea (6%), and anxiety (5%).
Wakix will be commercially available to healthcare professionals and appropriate patients in the U.S. in the fourth quarter of 2019.

About Wakix (pitolisant)

Wakix is a first-in-class medication approved for use in the U.S. for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy. It was granted orphan drug designation for the treatment of narcolepsy in 2010. WAKIX is a selective histamine 3 (H₃) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. The mechanism of action of Wakix is unclear; however, its efficacy could be mediated through its activity at H₃ receptors, thereby increasing the synthesis and release of histamine, a wake promoting neurotransmitter. WAKIX was designed and developed by Bioprojet Societe Civile de Recherche (Bioprojet), who has marketed the product in Europe since its approval by the European Medicines Agency in 2016. Harmony has an exclusive license from Bioprojet to develop, manufacture and commercialize pitolisant in the United States.
INDICATION AND USAGE
Wakix (pitolisant) is approved for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in adult patients with narcolepsy.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Do not use Wakix if you have severe liver disease.
Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you have heart rhythm irregularities, were born with a heart condition, or the levels of electrolytes in your blood are too high or too low. Wakix has an effect on the electrical activity of the heart known as QT/QTc prolongation. Medicines with this effect can lead to disturbances in heart rhythm, which are more likely in patients with risk factors such as certain heart conditions, or when taken in combination with other interacting medicines. Tell your healthcare provider about all the other medicines you take.
The risk of QT prolongation may be greater in patients with liver or kidney disease. Wakix is not recommended in patients with end stage kidney disease.
The most common side effects seen with Wakix were insomnia, nausea and anxiety. Other side effects included headache, upper respiratory infection, musculoskeletal pain, heart rate increased, and decreased appetite. These are not all the possible side effects of Wakix. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take or plan to take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Some medicines can increase the amount of Wakix that gets into your blood and some medicines can decrease the amount of Wakix that gets into your blood. The dosage of Wakix may need to be adjusted if you are taking these medicines.
Wakix can also decrease the effectiveness of some medicines, including hormonal birth control methods. You should use an alternative non-hormonal birth control method during treatment with Wakix and for at least 21 days after discontinuation of treatment.
Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women who are exposed to Wakix during pregnancy. You are encouraged to enroll in the Wakix pregnancy registry if you become pregnant while taking WAKIX. To enroll or obtain information from the registry, call 1-800-833-7460.
The safety and effectiveness of Wakix have not been established in patients less than 18 years of age.
https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Pitolisant#section=2D-Structure

Thursday, August 15, 2019

FDA Approves Boxed Warning About Increased Risk of Blood Clots and Death with Higher Dose of Tofacitinib (Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR)

In continuation of my update on tofacitinib 
Tofacitinib.svg
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved new warnings about an increased risk of blood clots and of death with the 10 mg twice daily dose of tofacitinib (Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR), which is used in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, the approved use of tofacitinib for ulcerative colitis will be limited to certain patients who are not treated effectively or who experience severe side effects with certain other medicines. We approved these changes, including adding our most prominent Boxed Warning, after reviewing interim data from an ongoing safety clinical trial of tofacitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that examined a lower and this higher dose of the medicine.
The 10 mg twice daily dose of tofacitinib is not approved for RA or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This dose is only approved for ulcerative colitis for initial treatment and for long-term use in limited situations. While the increased risks of blood clots and of death were seen in patients taking this dose for RA, these risks may also apply to those taking tofacitinib for ulcerative colitis.
Tofacitinib works by decreasing the activity of the immune system; an overactive immune system contributes to RA, PsA, and ulcerative colitis. Tofacitinib was first approved in 2012 to treat adult patients with RA who did not respond well to the medicine methotrexate. In RA, the body attacks its own joints, causing pain, swelling, and loss of function. In 2017, we approved the medicine to treat patients with a second condition that causes joint pain and swelling, PsA, who did not respond well to methotrexate or other similar medicines. In 2018, we approved tofacitinib to treat ulcerative colitis, which is a chronic, inflammatory disease affecting the colon.
Patients should tell your health care professionals if you have a history of blood clots or heart problems, and talk to them about any questions or concerns. Stop taking tofacitinib and seek emergency medical attention right away if you experience any unusual symptoms, including those that may signal a blood clot such as:
  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Chest pain that worsens with breathing
  • Swelling of a leg or arm
  • Leg pain or tenderness, or red or discolored skin in the painful or swollen leg or arm
Do not stop taking tofacitinib without first talking to your health care professional, as doing so can worsen your condition.
Health care professionals should discontinue tofacitinib and promptly evaluate patients with symptoms of thrombosis. Counsel patients about the risks and advise them to seek medical attention immediately if they experience any unusual symptoms, including those of thrombosis listed above. Reserve tofacitinib to treat ulcerative colitis for patients who have failed or do not tolerate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Avoid tofacitinib in patients who may have a higher risk of thrombosis. When treating ulcerative colitis, use tofacitinib at the lowest effective dose and limit the use of the 10 mg twice daily dosage to the shortest duration needed (See Additional Information for Health Care Professionals for more recommendations).
When FDA first approved tofacitinib in 2012, we required a postmarketing clinical trial in patients with RA on background methotrexate, to evaluate the risk of heart-related events, cancer, and infections. The trial is studying two different doses of tofacitinib (5 mg twice daily, which is the currently approved dose for RA, and a higher, 10 mg twice daily dosage) in comparison to a TNF blocker. An interim analysis of the trial’s results found an increased occurrence of blood clots and of death in patients treated with tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily compared to patients treated with tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily or a TNF blocker. Based on these results, the 10 mg twice daily treatment was stopped and patients were allowed to continue treatment on 5 mg twice daily.
This safety trial is ongoing. Patients in the 5 mg twice daily group and the TNF blocker group continue to be followed. FDA will reassess these safety issues when the trial has completed and final, verified data are available. We will update the public when additional information is available.
The interim results of the trial, as of January 2019, have identified the following:
  • 19 cases of blood clots in the lung out of 3,884 patient-years of follow-up in patients who received tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, compared to 3 cases out of 3,982 patient-years in patients who received TNF blockers
  • 45 cases of death from all causes out of 3,884 patient-years of follow-up in patients who received tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily, compared to 25 cases out of 3,982 patient-years in patients who received TNF blockers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofacitinib

FDA Approves Recarbrio (imipenem, cilastatin, and relebactam) for the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract and Complicated Intra-Abdominal Bacterial Infections

Imipenem.svgThumb  Relebactam structure.svg
Imipenem (Primaxin)                      Cilastatin                                     Relebactam


Merck (NYSE:MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Recarbrio (imipenem, cilastatin, and relebactam) for injection, 1.25 grams, a new combination antibacterial. Recarbrio is indicated in patients 18 years of age and older who have limited or no alternative treatment options, for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis, caused by the following susceptible Gram-negative microorganisms: Enterobacter cloacaeEscherichia coliKlebsiella aerogenesKlebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Recarbrio is also indicated in patients 18 years of age or older who have limited or no alternative treatment options, for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) caused by the following susceptible Gram-negative microorganisms: Bacteroides caccaeBacteroides fragilisBacteroides ovatusBacteroides stercorisBacteroides thetaiotaomicronBacteroides uniformisBacteroides vulgatusCitrobacter freundiiEnterobacter cloacaeEscherichia coliFusobacterium nucleatumKlebsiella aerogenesKlebsiella oxytocaKlebsiella pneumoniaeParabacteroides distasonis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Approval of these indications is based on limited clinical safety and efficacy data for Recarbrio.
To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Recarbrio and other antibacterial drugs, Recarbrio should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria. When culture and susceptibility information are available, they should be considered in selecting or modifying antibacterial therapy. In the absence of such data, local epidemiology and susceptibility patterns may contribute to the empiric selection of therapy.
Relebactam received FDA’s Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation for the treatment of cUTI and cIAI. The New Drug Application (NDA) for Recarbrio received Priority Review designation from the FDA. Merck anticipates making Recarbrio available later this year.
Recarbrio is contraindicated in patients with a history of known severe hypersensitivity (severe systemic allergic reaction such as anaphylaxis) to any component of Recarbrio. Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions have been reported in patients receiving therapy with beta-lactams. Central nervous system (CNS) adverse reactions, such as seizures, confusional states, and myoclonic activity, have been reported during treatment with imipenem/cilastatin, a component of Recarbrio, especially when recommended dosages of imipenem were exceeded. These reactions have been reported most commonly in patients with CNS disorders (such as brain lesions or a history of seizures) and/or compromised renal function. Concominant use of Recarbrio, with valproic acid or divalproex sodium may increase the risk of breakthrough seizures. Additionally, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including imipenem/cilastatin plus relebactam and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. See Important Safety Information below.
Recarbrio is a combination of imipenem/cilastatin and relebactam. Imipenem is a penem antibacterial drug, cilastatin sodium is a renal dehydropeptidase inhibitor, and relebactam is a beta lactamase inhibitor. Cilastatin limits the renal metabolism of imipenem and does not have antibacterial activity. The bactericidal activity of imipenem results from binding to PBP 2 and PBP 1B in Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the subsequent inhibition of penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). Inhibition of PBPs leads to the disruption of bacterial cell wall synthesis. Imipenem is stable in the presence of some beta lactamases. Relebactam has no intrinsic antibacterial activity. Relebactam protects imipenem from degradation by certain serine beta lactamases such as Sulhydryl Variable (SHV), Temoneira (TEM), Cefotaximase-Munich (CTX-M), Enterobacter cloacae P99 (P99), Pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinase (PDC), and Klebsiella-pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC).
Recarbrio provides an important addition to our toolkit in the ongoing fight against infections caused by certain Gram-negative pathogens,” said Dr. Keith Kaye, professor of medicine and director of research for the division of infectious diseases, University of Michigan Heath System, and a principal investigator in the clinical program. “Recarbrio offers an additional treatment option for patients with cIAI and cUTI who have limited and, in some cases, no alternative therapeutic options.”
“Today’s announcement is a great example of Merck’s longstanding commitment to infectious diseases research and development, as we continue to search for novel ways to approach difficult-to-treat pathogens,” said Dr. Nick Kartsonis, senior vice president, infectious diseases and vaccines, Merck Research Laboratories.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imipenem
https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB01597
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relebactam


Saturday, July 6, 2019

Statin Use Associated With Higher Incidence of Diabetes

In continuation of my update on statins
There may be a dose-dependent relationship between statin therapy and new-onset diabetes across the duration of statin use, according to a study recently published in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews.
Victoria A. Zigmont, Ph.D., from The Ohio State University in Columbus, and colleagues used medical records to retrospectively assess the risk of dysglycemia and new-onset diabetes among 7,064 individuals with indications for statin use. At baseline, participants were candidates for statins based on heart disease risk but had not started taking the drugs; 755 patients were eventually prescribed statins during the study period (2011 to 2014).
The researchers found that a higher prevalence of elevated hemoglobin A1c occurred among incident statin users without diabetes. Statin users also had a higher risk of developing new-onset diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.20). The greatest risk of developing new-onset diabetes was seen among those taking statins for two years or longer (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.33), with no differences seen by statin class or intensity of dose.
"As lifestyle programs like the Diabetes Prevention Program are promoted in primary care settings, we hope physicians will integrate and insurers support healthy lifestyle strategies as part of the optimal management of individuals at risk for both new-onset diabetes and cardiovascular disease," the authors write.
https://medlineplus.gov/statins.html


Wednesday, July 3, 2019

FDA Approves Mavyret (glecaprevir and pibrentasvir) as First Treatment for All Genotypes of Hepatitis C in Pediatric Patients


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mavyret (telaprevir and pibrentasvir) tablets to treat all six genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in children ages 12 to 17. Mavyret was previously approved to treat HCV in adults in 2017.

Glecaprevir.png  Pibrentasvir.svg Pibrentasvir
                                  Glecaprevir
“Direct-acting antiviral drugs reduce the amount of HCV in the body by preventing the virus from multiplying, and in most cases, they cure HCV infection,” said Jeffrey Murray, M.D., M.P.H., deputy director of the Division of Antiviral Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Today’s approval represents another treatment option for children and adolescents with HCV infection, but for the first time, in all genotypes of HCV.”
HCV is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the liver that can lead to diminished liver function or liver failure. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 2.7 to 3.9 million people in the U.S. have chronic HCV, and children born to HCV-positive mothers are at risk for HCV infection. It is estimated that there are 23,000 to 46,000 children in the U.S. with HCV infection.
With today’s approval, dosing information is provided for Mavyret for the treatment of adult or pediatric patients 12 years and older, or weighing at least 99 pounds, who are infected with any of six identified HCV genotypes either without cirrhosis or with compensated cirrhosis.
The safety and efficacy of Mavyret in pediatric patients was evaluated during clinical trials of 47 patients with genotype 1, 2, 3 or 4 HCV infection without cirrhosis or with mild cirrhosis. Results of the trials demonstrated that 100 percent of patients who received Mavyret for eight or 16 weeks had no virus detected in the blood 12 weeks after finishing treatment, suggesting that patients’ infection had been cured. In pediatric patients with cirrhosis, history of a kidney and/or liver transplant, or genotype 5 or 6 HCV infection, the safety and efficacy of Mavyret are supported by previous studies observed in glecaprevir and pibrentasvir in adults. The adverse reactions observed were consistent with those observed in clinical studies of Mavyret in adults.
Treatment duration with Mavyret differs depending on treatment history, viral genotype and cirrhosis status. The most common adverse reactions in patients taking Mavyret were headache and fatigue. Mavyret is not recommended in patients with moderate cirrhosis and contraindicated in patients with severe cirrhosis. It is also contraindicated in patients taking the drugs atazanavir and rifampin.
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation has been reported in HCV/HBV coinfected adult patients who were undergoing or had completed treatment with HCV direct-acting antivirals, and who were not receiving HBV antiviral therapy. HBV reactivation in patients treated with direct-acting antiviral medicines can result in serious liver problems or death in some patients. Health care professionals should screen all patients for evidence of current or prior HBV infection before starting treatment with Mavyret.

https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB13879
https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Glecaprevir#section=Structures
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pibrentasvir
https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Pibrentasvir




Tuesday, July 2, 2019

FDA Approves Qternmet XR (dapagliflozin, saxagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) for Type 2 Diabetes




In continuation of my update on dapagliflozin, and metformin hydrochloride



Dapagliflozin skeletal.svg 
Dapagliflozin           Saxagliptin structure.svg Saxagliptin                                   and  Thumb(Metformin)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Qternmet XR(dapagliflozin, saxagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) extended release tablets as an oral adjunct treatment to diet and exercise to improve glycaemic control in adults with type-2 diabetes (T2D).
The approval is based on two Phase III trials, which evaluated combinations of dapagliflozin and saxagliptin on a background of metformin over 24 weeks, in patients with inadequately-controlled T2D.
In one trial, treatment with 5mg dapagliflozin/5mg saxagliptin in addition to metformin demonstrated statistically-significant decreases in HbA1c (average blood glucose levels), and an increase in the number of patients achieving the recommended HbA1c treatment goal of <7%. In the second trial, treatment with 10mg dapagliflozin/5mg saxagliptin in addition to metformin extended release demonstrated statistically-significant decreases in HbA1c, and an increase in the number of patients achieving an HbA1c <7%.
The safety results of the individual medicines in these trials were consistent with their known profile.

About Qternmet XR

Qternmet XR is a once-daily, oral medicine compromised of the selective sodium‑glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor dapagliflozin, the dipeptidyl peptidase‑4 (DPP‑4) inhibitor saxagliptin and metformin hydrochloride extended release. Qternmet XR is approved in the US as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycaemic control in adults with type-2 diabetes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dapagliflozin
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxagliptin
https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB06335
https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB00331
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metformin


Sunday, June 30, 2019

FDA Approves Duobrii (halobetasol propionate and tazarotene) Lotion 0.01%/0.045% for Plaque Psoriasis In Adults

In continuation of my update on   tazarotene


Ulobetasol.svg 
Ulobetasol                                                                      Skeletal formula of tazarotene


                                                                                                                      Tazarotene

Bausch Health Companies Inc. (NYSE/TSX: BHC) and its dermatology business, Ortho Dermatologics, one of the largest prescription dermatology health care businesses, announced,  that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the New Drug Application for Duobrii (halobetasol propionate and tazarotene) Lotion, 0.01%/0.045%, indicated for the topical treatment of plaque psoriasis in adults. Duobrii is the first and only topical lotion that contains a unique combination of halobetasol propionate and tazarotene in one formulation. In a year-long safety study, patients used Duobrii Lotion for up to 24 weeks of continuous use and up to 52 weeks of as-needed use.2 Duobrii is expected to be available in June 2019.
"With today's approval of Duobrii, patients suffering from plaque psoriasis now have an innovative topical treatment option that uniquely combines two well-known ingredients, halobetasol propionate and tazarotene, with established safety profiles, into a single lotion featuring dual mechanisms of action," said Bill Humphries, president, Ortho Dermatologics. "Since psoriasis is a chronic skin disease, patients require continuous treatment in order to achieve optimal control of their symptoms. Now, with Duobrii, health care professionals and their patients have a new topical treatment option that can help them achieve those long-term goals. As a result, we believe that Duobrii has the potential to delay some patients from switching to more expensive biologic treatments, which could potentially result in health care savings."
Continued Mr. Humphries, "We remain committed to bringing forward new medicines, like Duobrii, to add to our portfolio of topicals and biologics to meet the varying treatment needs of patients with psoriasis."
When used separately to treat plaque psoriasis, the duration of use of halobetasol propionate is limited by FDA labeling constraints and the use of tazarotene can be limited due to tolerability concerns. By combining halobetasol propionate and tazarotene in an advanced, patented once-daily moisturizing lotion, the Duobrii formulation ensures uniform distribution, allowing for simultaneous contact with the skin surface.
In the United States, approximately 7.5 million people live with psoriasis, with 80 percent having plaque psoriasis.3 Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of psoriasis, a chronic, non-contagious skin disease that alters the life cycle of skin cells, causing them to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin.
"Duobrii provides the known benefits of a potent topical corticosteroid and a topical retinoid with synergistic efficacy. Combination therapy is the mainstay of topical treatment for plaque psoriasis, making Duobrii an important new option," said Linda Stein Gold, M.D., director, Dermatology Clinical Research, Henry Ford Health System. "Although effective, topical retinoids have had limited use as monotherapy due to tolerability concerns. Duobrii provides improved local tolerability, allowing patients to benefit from an extended duration of use."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulobetasol
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tazarotene


Saturday, June 29, 2019

Agios Announces FDA Approval of Tibsovo as Monotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Adult Patients with IDH1 Mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy


TIBSOVO├é® (ivosidenib) Structural Formula Illustration


Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a leader in the field of cellular metabolism to treat cancer and rare genetic diseases,  announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to update the U.S. Prescribing Information for Tibsovo, an isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) inhibitor, to include adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a susceptible IDH1 mutation as detected by an FDA-approved test who are ≥ 75 years old or who have comorbidities that preclude use of intensive induction chemotherapy. The sNDA was granted Priority Review and accepted under the FDA's Real-Time Oncology Review pilot program, which aims to make the review of oncology drugs more efficient by allowing the FDA access to clinical trial data before the information is formally submitted to the agency. Tibsovo received initial FDA approval in July 2018 for adult patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) AML and an IDH1 mutation1.
“Despite several new AML medicines approved in the last two years, many newly diagnosed patients are still not eligible for existing therapies or combination regimens because of age and other comorbidities,” said Chris Bowden, M.D., chief medical officer at Agios. “With today’s additional Tibsovo approval, we are now able to provide a targeted, oral therapy to patients with an IDH1 mutation who may not have other treatment options. In addition, we are continuing our work to expand the utility of Tibsovo in newly diagnosed AML patients in ongoing Phase 3 trials in combination with both intensive chemotherapy and azacitidine. I would like to thank the patients, nurses, physicians and caregivers who participated in the clinical trial, as well as the tremendous employees at Agios whose focus on patients made this possible.”
AML is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow marked by rapid disease progression and is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults with approximately 20,000 new cases estimated in the U.S. each year2,3. AML patients are typically older or have comorbidities that preclude the use of intensive chemotherapy4. These patients typically have a worse prognosis and poor outcomes5. The majority of patients with AML eventually relapse6. The five-year survival rate is approximately 28%2. For 6 to 10 percent of AML patients, the mutated IDH1 enzyme blocks normal blood stem cell differentiation, contributing to the genesis of acute leukemia7. IDH1 mutations have been associated with negative prognosis in AML.
“The Phase 1 results for Tibsovo demonstrated that this oral, single agent therapy can induce durable responses in newly diagnosed AML patients with an IDH1 mutation,” said Gail J. Roboz, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Director of the Leukemia Program and a member of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center*. “Many patients included in the study had features associated with particularly aggressive and challenging forms of AML, including secondary disease, adverse risk genetics and prior treatment with hypomethylating agents.”
Tibsovo Safety and Efficacy Data
The efficacy of Tibsovo was evaluated in an open-label, single-arm, multicenter clinical trial (Study AG120-C-001, NCT02074839) that included 28 adult patients with newly diagnosed AML with an IDH1 mutation who were assigned to receive a 500 mg daily dose. The cohort included patients who were age 75 or older or had comorbidities that precluded the use of intensive induction chemotherapy (baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group [ECOG] performance status of ≥2, severe cardiac or pulmonary disease, hepatic impairment with bilirubin >1.5 times the upper limit of normal, or creatinine clearance <45 mL/min). Patients had a median age of 77 years (range of 64 to 87) and 68% had AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. The primary endpoint is the combined complete remission (CR) and complete remission with partial hematologic improvement (CRh) rate. CRh is defined as <5% of blasts in the bone marrow, no evidence of disease and partial recovery of peripheral blood counts (platelets >50,000/microliter and ANC >500/microliter).
In this trial, Tibsovo demonstrated:
  • CR+CRh rate of 42.9% (12 of 28 patients) (95% CI: 24.5, 62.8).
  • The CR rate was 28.6% (8 of 28 patients) (95% CI 13.2, 48.7) and the CRh rate was 14.3% (4 of 28 patients) (95% CI 4.0, 32.7).
  • Median durations of CR and CR+CRh were not estimable, with 5 patients (41.7%) who achieved CR or CRh remaining on Tibsovo treatment (treatment duration range: 20.3 to 40.9 months) as of the data cutoff.
  • 58.3% (7 of 12) of patients who achieved CR or CRh were in remission at 1 year after receiving treatment.
  • For patients who achieved a CR or CRh, the median time to best response of CR or CRh was 2.8 months (range, 1.9 to 12.9 months).
  • Among the 17 patients who were dependent on red blood cell (RBC) and/or platelet transfusions at baseline, 7 (41.2%) became independent of RBC and platelet transfusions during any 56-day post-baseline period.
  • Of the 11 patients who were independent of both RBC and platelet transfusions at baseline, 6 (54.5%) remained transfusion independent during any 56-day post-baseline period.
The safety profile of single-agent Tibsovo was evaluated in 28 patients with newly diagnosed AML with an IDH1 mutation treated with a dose of 500 mg daily. The median duration of exposure to Tibsovo was 4.3 months (range, 0.3 to 40.9 months). In the clinical trial, 25% (7 of 28) of patients treated with Tibsovo experienced differentiation syndrome, which can be fatal if not treated. Of the 7 patients with newly diagnosed AML who experienced differentiation syndrome, 6 (86%) patients recovered. QTc interval prolongation occurred in patients treated with Tibsovo. The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) of any grade in patients with newly diagnosed AML were diarrhea, fatigue, decreased appetite, edema, nausea, leukocytosis, arthralgia, abdominal pain, dyspnea, myalgia, constipation, differentiation syndrome, dizziness, electrocardiogram QT prolonged, mucositis and vomiting.

About Tibsovo (ivosidenib)

Tibsovo is indicated for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a susceptible isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) mutation as detected by an FDA-approved test in:
Adult patients with newly-diagnosed AML who are ≥75 years old or who have comorbidities that preclude use of intensive induction chemotherapy.
Adult patients with relapsed or refractory AML.


https://www.rxlist.com/tibsovo-drug.htm#indications

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivosidenib



Friday, June 28, 2019

FDA Approves Ruzurgi (amifampridine) for Children with Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

In continuation of my update on amifampridine

Diaminopyridine.png

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Ruzurgi (amifampridine) tablets for the treatment of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) in patients 6 years to less than 17 years of age. This is the first FDA approval of a treatment specifically for pediatric patients with LEMS. The only other treatment approved for LEMS is only approved for use in adults.
“We continue to be committed to facilitating the development and approval of treatments for rare diseases, particularly those in children,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This approval will provide a much-needed treatment option for pediatric patients with LEMS who have significant weakness and fatigue that can often cause great difficulties with daily activities.”
LEMS is a rare autoimmune disorder that affects the connection between nerves and muscles and causes weakness and other symptoms in affected patients. In people with LEMS, the body’s own immune system attacks the neuromuscular junction (the connection between nerves and muscles) and disrupts the ability of nerve cells to send signals to muscle cells. LEMS may be associated with other autoimmune diseases, but more commonly occurs in patients with cancer such as small cell lung cancer, where its onset precedes or coincides with the diagnosis of cancer. LEMS can occur at any age. The prevalence of LEMS specifically in pediatric patients is not known, but the overall prevalence of LEMS is estimated to be three per million individuals worldwide.
Use of Ruzurgi in patients 6 to less than 17 years of age is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies of the drug in adults with LEMS, pharmacokinetic data in adult patients, pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation to identify the dosing regimen in pediatric patients and safety data from pediatric patients 6 to less than 17 years of age.
The effectiveness of Ruzurgi for the treatment of LEMS was established by a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled withdrawal study of 32 adult patients in which patients were taking Ruzurgi for at least three months prior to entering the study. The study compared patients continuing on Ruzurgi to patients switched to placebo. Effectiveness was measured by the degree of change in a test that assessed the time it took the patient to rise from a chair, walk three meters, and return to the chair for three consecutive laps without pause. The patients that continued on Ruzurgi experienced less impairment than those on placebo. Effectiveness was also measured with a self-assessment scale for LEMS-related weakness that evaluated the feeling of weakening or strengthening. The scores indicated greater perceived weakening in the patients switched to placebo.
The most common side effects experienced by pediatric and adult patients taking Ruzurgi were burning or prickling sensation (paresthesia), abdominal pain, indigestion, dizziness and nausea. Side effects reported in pediatric patients were similar to those seen in adult patients. Seizures have been observed in patients without a history of seizures. Patients should inform their health care professional immediately if they have signs of hypersensitivity reactions such as rash, hives, itching, fever, swelling or trouble breathing.
The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Fast Track designations. Ruzurgi also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amifampridine

Thursday, June 27, 2019

FDA Approves Bavencio (avelumab) Plus Inlyta (axitinib) Combination for Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma



In continuation of my update on axitinib



Image result for Balversa (erdafitinib)



Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, which operates its biopharmaceutical business as EMD Serono in the US and Canada, and Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Bavencio (avelumab) in combination with Inlyta (axitinib) for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). This is the first FDA approval for an anti-PD-L1 therapy as part of a combination regimen for patients with advanced RCC. The approval of Bavencio in combination with Inlyta was based on positive results from the Phase III JAVELIN Renal 101 study (NCT02684006), in which the combination significantly improved median progression-free survival (PFS) compared with sunitinib by more than five months in the intent-to-treat (ITT) patient population (HR: 0.69 [95% CI: 0.56–0.84]; 2-sided p-value=0.0002; median PFS for Bavencio in combination with Inlyta: 13.8 months [95% CI: 11.1-NE]; sunitinib: 8.4 months [95% CI: 6.9-11.1]). The ITT population included patients regardless of PD-L1 expression and across IMDC (International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database) prognostic risk groups (favorable 21%, intermediate 62% and poor 16%).

“As we look to continue to improve outcomes for people with advanced RCC, new treatment approaches have the potential to benefit patients,” said Robert J. Motzer, M.D., Jack and Dorothy Byrne Chair in Clinical Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, US, and principal investigator for JAVELIN Renal 101. “With today’s FDA approval of avelumab in combination with axitinib, we can now offer patients with advanced RCC a first-line treatment option that combines a PD-L1 immunotherapy with a well-known VEGFR TKI to provide a significant reduction in the risk of disease progression or death and doubling of the response rate compared with sunitinib.”
RCC is a type of cancer where PD-L1 expression may contribute to inhibition of the immune response against the tumor.2 It is also a highly vascular tumor, in which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role.3
“A kidney cancer diagnosis is life-changing for both patients and their loved ones, and having a treatment strategy for their disease quickly becomes a priority,” said Dena Battle, President, KCCure. “The approval of new treatments such as Bavencio in combination with Inlyta gives patients with advanced RCC much-needed options.”
There is a significant unmet need for first-line treatments that delay progression and have an acceptable safety profile. Approximately 20% to 30% of patients are first diagnosed with RCC at the advanced stage, and 30% of patients treated for an earlier stage go on to develop metastases.4,5 About half of patients living with advanced RCC do not go on to receive additional treatment after first-line therapy,6,7 for reasons that may include poor performance status or adverse events from their initial treatment.6,8,9
“Today’s approval of Bavencio in combination with Inlyta builds on Pfizer’s long heritage in bringing innovation to the RCC community with the hopes of making a significant and meaningful impact on the lives of patients,” said Andy Schmeltz, Global President, Pfizer Oncology. “For more than 12 years, Pfizer has led the field in its commitment to developing new treatments for patients with advanced kidney cancer.”
“With today’s FDA approval of Bavencio in combination with Inlyta, we feel privileged that we can offer patients with first-line advanced renal cell carcinoma a new treatment option,” said Rehan Verjee, President, EMD Serono, and Global Head of Innovative Medicine Franchises, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.
In JAVELIN Renal 101, the objective response rate (ORR) was doubled in the ITT population with Bavencio in combination with Inlyta versus sunitinib (51.4% [95% CI: 46.6-56.1] vs. 25.7% [95% CI: 21.7-30.0]). With a median overall survival (OS) follow-up of 19 months, data for the trial’s other primary endpoint of OS were immature, with 27% of deaths in the ITT population, and the trial is continuing as planned. The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were diarrhea, fatigue, hypertension, musculoskeletal pain, nausea, mucositis, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, dysphonia, decreased appetite, hypothyroidism, rash, hepatotoxicity, cough, dyspnea, abdominal pain and headache. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 35% of patients receiving Bavencio in combination with Inlyta. The incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) was higher with Bavencio in combination with Inlyta versus sunitinib.1 Findings from the study have been published in The New England Journal of Medicine.10
The European Medicines Agency (EMA) validated the Type II variation application for Bavencio in combination with Inlyta in advanced RCC in March 2019, and a supplemental application for Bavencio in combination with Inlyta in unresectable or metastatic RCC was submitted in Japan in January 2019.
The alliance is committed to providing patient access and reimbursement support through its CoverOne® program to patients who have been prescribed Bavencio. This program provides a spectrum of patient access and reimbursement support services intended to help US patients prescribed Bavencio receive appropriate access. CoverOne may be reached by phone at 844-8COVER1 (844-826-8371) or online at www.CoverOne.com.
Pfizer is committed to ensuring that patients who are prescribed Inlyta have access to this innovative therapy. Patients in the US have access to Pfizer Oncology Together™, which offers personalized support and financial assistance resources to help patients access their prescribed Pfizer Oncology medications. For more information, please call 1-877-744-5675 or visit PfizerOncologyTogether.com.
In an effort to streamline the patient enrollment process, EMD Serono and Pfizer have partnered to create a single enrollment form for the Bavencio and Inlyta combination for patients with advanced RCC that can be processed through both CoverOne and Pfizer Oncology Together. Each program will independently conduct the access and reimbursement activities for the product for which it is responsible.
Ref : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axitinib





FDA Approves Bavencio (avelumab) Plus Inlyta (axitinib) Combination for Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma