Showing posts with label relapsed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label relapsed. Show all posts

Monday, February 22, 2016

Ibrutinib ‘new standard’ for relapsed, refractory mantle cell lymphoma

In continuation of my update on Ibrutinib and Temsirolimus

Temsirolimus2DACS.svgTemsirolimus


Phase III trial findings suggest that patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma derive significantly greater benefits from ibrutinib than from temsirolimus therapy.
Ibrutinib.svgIbrutinib

The results of this direct comparison of the two treatment options approved in the European Union for this patient population “clearly establish ibrutinib as a new standard for treatment” of relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, says Peter Martin (Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA) in a comment accompanying the report in The Lancet.

He adds: “Many clinicians expect that, within the next 2 years, ibrutinib will find its way into the front-line setting for treatment of mantle cell lymphoma in combination with standard chemotherapy”.

In the trial, a total of 280 patients with relapsed or refractory disease who had previously been treated with at least one rituximab-containing regimen were followed up for a median of 20 months.

Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 14.6 months for the 139 patients randomly assigned to receive open-label oral ibrutinib and 6.2 months for the 141 patients given intravenous temsirolimus, a significant difference with a hazard ratio for progression or death of 0.43. The corresponding 2-year PFS rates were 41% and 7%.

Significantly more patients given the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib achieved an overall response compared with those given the mammalian target of rapamycin antagonist temsirolimus, with rates of 72% versus 40%. And complete responses were observed in 19% and 1% of patients, respectively.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Role for carfilzomib in relapsed, refractory multiple myeloma treatment


Carfilzomib.svg


In continuation of my update on carfilzomib

Carfilzomib significantly improves outcomes in previously treated patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, shows a head-to-head comparison with bortezomib.

In the ENDEAVOR phase III trial, published in The Lancet Oncology, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 18.7 months for the 464 patients randomly assigned to receive open-label carfilzomib plus dexamethasone. This was significantly longer than the 9.4 months for the 465 participants treated with bortezomib and dexamethasone, and equated to a 47% risk reduction in favour of carfilzomib.

Moreover, a significantly higher proportion of carfilzomib- than bortezomib-treated patients achieved an objective response, at 77% versus 63%, and the duration of response was also longer in the former group, at a respective 21.3 and 10.4 months.
The most common side effects of grade 3 or worse that occurred more frequently in the carfilzomib than the bortezomib treatment arm were anaemia and hypertension, with rates of 14% versus 10% and 9% versus 3%, respectively.

However, peripheral neuropathy of grade 3 was observed in 2% of carfilzomib-treated patients and there were no grade 4 events, compared with 8% of patients in the bortezomib arm who experienced events of grade 3 or 4.

Serious adverse events occurred in 48% of patients in the carfilzomib group and in 36% of those given bortezomib, but Meletios Dimopoulos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece) and team note that the number of discontinuations and deaths attributable to adverse events were comparable between the groups.

They conclude that carfilzomib plus dexamethasone could be considered for multiple myeloma patients for whom bortezomib is indicated.