Showing posts sorted by relevance for query lenalidomide. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query lenalidomide. Sort by date Show all posts

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Combination treatment produces better outcomes in erythropoietin-refractory MDS patients, study shows

In continuation of my updates  lenalidomide

Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) suffer from a reduction in the number of different types of blood cells, including red blood cells leading to the development of anemia. Many patients with lower-risk MDS benefit from treatment with recombinant-erythropoietin (rHuEPO), which stimulates blood cell production. However, patients who become refractory to rHuEPO have few effective treatment options.
Lenalidomide enantiomers.svg 


Alan F. List, M.D., president and CEO of Moffitt Cancer Center, will present interim results from the phase 3 ECOG-ACRIN E2905 Intergroup Study at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in San Diego. The study shows that lenalidomide in combination with epoetin alpha produced better outcomes and similar toxicity as lenalidomide alone in patients with erythropoietin-refractory, lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

Early phase clinical trials have demonstrated that lenalidomide improves blood cell production in transfusion-dependent non-del(5q) MDS, leading to transfusion-dependence in 26 percent of patients. Additionally, data from a pilot trial suggested that lenalidomide in combination with epoetin alpha may overcome resistance and improve response rates in erythropoietin-refractory MDS patients.

This observation led to the initiation of a phase 3 trial to assess if lenalidomide combined with epoetin alpha improves the major erythroid response rate after 4 cycles of treatment when compared to lenalidomide alone in patients with low or intermediate-1 risk MDS who were unresponsive to rHuEPO treatment or were transfusion-dependent with serum erythropoietin levels greater than 500 mU/mL.

An interim analysis of 163 patients randomized to lenalidomide (n = 81) or lenalidomide + epoetin alpha (n = 82) showed that the study met the predefined stopping criteria. Lenalidomide + epoetin alpha treatment resulted in significantly better erythroid responses than lenalidomide alone among 116 evaluable patients, with a major erythroid response rate at 16 weeks of 33.3 percent for lenalidomide + epoetin alpha and 14.3 percent for lenalidomide alone. The treatment groups had similar rates and types of grade 3 or higher non-hematologic adverse events. Additionally, a biomarker analysis of responding patients suggested that the erythroid CD45 isoform may predict response to combination treatment.

More  at Medical News

Friday, May 25, 2012

Lenalidomide Shows Significant Benefit for Myeloma Patients, Phase III Study Suggests

In continuation of my update on lenalidomide...

Data from the first large U.S. study assessing the effectiveness of long-term "maintenance" therapy with lenalidomide for patients with multiple myeloma show that the drug significantly improves the time to progression and overall survival for patients with this often-deadly hematologic cancer. 

Among 460 patients aged 18 to 70 (median age 59), 321 were randomly assigned to the lenalidomide arm, and 229 to the placebo group. All participants had received prior autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and had stable (non-progressing) disease. The participants' assignments and responses to date were unblinded in December 2009 when the primary endpoint of the study (time to disease progression) showed a statistically significant difference between the two study groups. After January 2010, 86 of 128 eligible patients crossed over from the placebo arm to the active arm.

The researchers found that the therapy extended the time to disease progression by 19 months overall, even with the majority of placebo patients without progression crossing over to lenalidomide. The treatment was fairly well-tolerated particularly as compared to other treatments for multiple myeloma, such as thalidomide. There was more hematologic toxicity, particularly neutropenia, in the lenalidomide group. When the study data was analyzed again in October 2011, at a median follow-up of 34 months, 37% of participants receiving lenalidomide had disease progression or had died, compared to 58% of those in the placebo group.

"These findings fill a gap that existed previously in terms of data on whether maintenance therapy with lenalidomide prolongs the time to disease progression after initial therapy. We now have evidence that it does, in this and the two other lenalidomide studies that are presented in this issue of the Journal," said Dr. McCarthy. "This shows that patients with multiple myeloma now have options for prolonging the response to initial therapy. The next steps will be trying to improve on these responses by adding new agents that may prove even more effective in combination with lenalidomide following transplant."

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Maintenance lenalidomide treatment improves overall survival in multiple myeloma patients


In continuation of my update on lenalidomide 


Lenalidomide2DACS2.svg lenalidomide 

While several clinical trials have demonstrated that maintenance therapy with lenalidomide reduces the risk of disease progression in patients with multiple myeloma, there have been no definitive results regarding overall survival. While some previous studies found that maintenance lenalidomide after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant improved overall survival for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients, others showed no benefit to this approach. Philip McCarthy, MD, Director of Blood & Marrow Transplant at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), will present the findings of an international team of researchers at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 52nd Annual Meeting in Chicago.

The new study is a meta-analysis of three randomized controlled trials conducted by the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (formerly Cancer and Leukemia Group B) (CALGB) with support from the NCI, Intergroupe Francophone du Myélome (IFM), and the Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell'Adulto (GIMEMA). It involved more than 1,200 participants. For this analysis, 605 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma and treated with continuous lenalidomide (brand name Revlimid) following autologous stem cell transplant were compared to 604 patients who were treated with placebo or no maintenance. At seven years, 62% of those treated with maintenance lenalidomide had survived, compared to 50% of those in the control group. The benefit in overall survival was consistent across subgroups.

"Lenalidomide maintenance following autologous stem cell transplant can now be considered a standard of care for people with multiple myeloma," says Dr. McCarthy, senior author on the meta-analysis and Principal Investigator of the U.S. study, CALGB (Alliance) 100104. "The improvements over the last decade in terms of both survival and quality of life for patients with this disease are striking, and very encouraging."

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Lenalidomide offers an effective alternative treatment for cutaneus lupus erythematosus, study suggests

In continuation of my update on lenalidomide

A new study into the thalidomide derivative lenalidomide,  shows that treatment with lenalidomide is safe, with patients seeing an improvement in as little as two weeks. 


There have been several small scale clinical studies into the use of thalidomide for cutaneus lupus erythematosus,  CLE for the third of patients which do not respond to the standard therapy including steroids, antimalarials and immunosuppressive agents. Although thalidomide has a bad press because of its effects on embryonic development, properly administered it is an effective alternative treatment for several types of cancer and inflammatory conditions, albeit with severe side effects which can limit continuous use.

Lenalidomide has been suggested as a more potent, but less toxic, alternative, and previous studies on a small number of patients have had encouraging results. In order to examine the efficacy of lenalidomide more thoroughly researchers from Vall d´Hebron University Hospital Research Institute, Spain, initiated a phase II clinical study, following 15 people with CLE, for between 7 and 30 months, all of which had previously not responded to traditional therapy.

All but one of the people involved in the trial saw clinical improvement and most of these (86%) had complete response, reaching a CLASI score of 0. Three quarters of people who improved with lenalidomide relapsed within 2-8 weeks of the medication being stopped or reduced.

In this study side effects were minor. Only two people reported side effects  although for one person their gastrointestinal symptoms meant that they stopped taking lenalidomide after one week. For both people the side effects disappeared once they stopped taking the drug.

Ref : http://arthritis-research.com/content/14/6/R265/abstract

Monday, September 4, 2017

Study shows three-drug combination delays recurrence and lengthens life for myeloma patients

In continuation of my update on lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone

The International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) today announced the publication in The Lancet of the results of a randomized, phase III trial, conducted by SWOG, a publicly funded international cancer clinical trials network, and led by IMF chairman of the board Brian G.M. Durie, MD. This important trial compared the effectiveness of two drug regimens in patients undergoing their first round of treatment for multiple myeloma. The trial shows that a three-drug combination - known as VRd - delays recurrence and lengthens life for myeloma patients, indicating a possible new standard of care.

One regimen used in the study was lenalidomide with dexamethasone, a standard first-line treatment for myeloma patients. The other drug regimen also included bortezomib, a second-line drug typically given to myeloma patients whose cancer progresses after initial therapy. SWOG researchers found that the addition of bortezomib earlier made a difference for myeloma patients, giving them about another year of remission and another year of life compared to the standard two-drug regimen.

"Our results are clear. Using bortezomib in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in front-line treatment - hitting the disease early and hard - makes a meaningful difference for myeloma patients," said study principal investigator Dr. Durie, a physician at Cedars-Sinai Outpatient Cancer Center in Los Angeles. "Our results represent a potential new standard of care."

"This is a landmark study that lends clarity to frontline therapy of myeloma," said Dr. S. Vincent Rajkumar of Mayo Clinic and a co-author of the study. "Newer alternatives to VRd may be more expensive, cumbersome, or toxic. These regimens will therefore need to show superiority over VRd in randomized trials."

Also worth noting, Dr. Rajkumar said, is that the VRd regimen will become even more cost effective as the drugs in this combination become generic over time.

Bortezomib.svg bortezomib   Lenalidomide enantiomers.svg  lenalidomide

Skeletal formula of dexamethasone  dexamethasone



Patients in the trial receiving bortezomib, along with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, in their first six months of treatment had a median remission time of 43 months compared to a median remission of 30 months for patients who received lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone. Researchers also found that patients who received bortezomib lived a median of 75 months, or about six years, after their initial treatment. Patients who received the standard two-drug treatment lived a median of 64 months, or about five years, after initial treatment.
Celebrating its 60th year, SWOG has conducted more than 1,300 cancer trials that have led to FDA approval of 14 new drugs and led to more than 100 changes to cancer standards of care. SWOG is part of the NCI's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), the nation's largest and oldest publicly funded cancer research network. SWOG members and other members in the NCTN enrolled 471 eligible and consented adult patients in the study, known as S0777, between February 2008 and February 2012, at 139 institutions across the US.

Patients ranged in age from 28 to 87, had active myeloma, and had not had a stem-cell transplant or any prior treatment for their disease. Patients were randomized into two groups. One group received the standard two-drug treatment for six cycles over six months. That includes lenalidomide, an immunomodulating therapy marketed as Revlimid by Celegene Corporation. The other group received a three-drug combination that included bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor marketed as Velcade by Millennium Pharmaceuticals. These patients received the triple combination therapy for eight cycles over six months.

Saturday, October 5, 2019

FDA Approves Revlimid (lenalidomide) In Combination with Rituximab for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Previously Treated Follicular Lymphoma or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

In continuation of my update on lenalidomide

Lenalidomide enantiomers.svg

Celgene Corporation,  announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Revlimid (lenalidomide) in combination with a rituximab product (R²) for the treatment of adult patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma (FL) or marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) following Priority Review designation. This is the first FDA-approved combination treatment regimen for patients with these indolent forms of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) that does not include chemotherapy.
“Nearly 15 years following the initial FDA approval, Revlimid continues to demonstrate benefits for new patient populations,” said Jay Backstrom, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Celgene. “Revlimid in combination with rituximab (R2) leads to immune-mediated treatment effects and represents a chemotherapy-free treatment option that can help patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma delay disease progression.”
Immune dysfunction (meaning the immune system is not functioning optimally) is a defining aspect of indolent forms of NHL, including FL and MZL.1,2 When this dysfunction occurs, lymphocytes in the immune system either fail to detect or target cancerous cells.1,2
“Chemotherapy continues to be a standard of care for indolent forms of NHL, but most patients will relapse or become refractory to their current treatment,” said Meghan Gutierrez, Chief Executive Officer for the Lymphoma Research Foundation. “This approval represents a new therapeutic option for previously treated patients with follicular and marginal zone lymphomas, including those who relapse or no longer respond to initial treatment. We commend the patients and scientists who participated in the clinical study for advancing lymphoma research and treatment.”
The approval of R2 is based primarily on results from the randomized, double-blind, Phase 3 AUGMENT study, which evaluated the efficacy and safety of the R² combination versus rituximab plus placebo in patients with previously treated FL (n=295) and MZL (n=63).
In the AUGMENT study, treatment with R2 demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS), evaluated by an independent review committee, versus rituximab-placebo. The median PFS was 39.4 months for patients treated with R2 and 14.1 months for those treated with rituximab-placebo (HR: 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34-0.62; P<0.0001). Median follow-up time was 28.3 months (range, 0.1-51.3) in the intent to treat population (n=358). Although not statistically powered to detect a difference in overall survival, a numeric trend for improvement in overall survival (a secondary endpoint) was also seen with R2 versus rituximab-placebo (16 vs. 26 deaths) (HR: 0.61; 95% CI, 0.33-1.13).
Revlimid is only available through a restricted distribution program called Revlimid REMS® program. Revlimid has a boxed warning for embryo-fetal toxicity, hematologic toxicity, and venous and arterial thromboembolism. Adverse reactions reported in ≥15% of patients with FL/MZL treated with R2 were: neutropenia (58%), diarrhea (31%), constipation (26%), cough (24%), fatigue (22%), rash (22%), pyrexia (21%), leukopenia (20%), pruritus (20%), upper respiratory tract infections (18%), abdominal pain (18%), anemia (16%), headache (15%), thrombocytopenia (15%).
A Marketing Authorization Application for R2 is currently under review by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of relapsed/refractory FL and MZL. A supplemental new drug application was also submitted to the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency for an additional indication as well as dosage and administration updates for lenalidomide in combination with rituximab for the treatment of relapsed/refractory indolent B-cell NHL.


Thursday, June 13, 2013

FDA Approves Revlimid (lenalidomide) for the Treatment of Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

In continuation of my update on Lenalidomide

We know that, Lenalidomide (Revlimid) is a derivative of thalidomide introduced in 2004. It was initially intended as a treatment for multiple myeloma, for which thalidomide is an accepted therapeutic treatment. Lenalidomide has also shown efficacy in the class of hematological disorders known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Lenalidomide has significantly improved overall survival in myeloma (which generally carries a poor prognosis), although toxicity remains an issue for users.

Monday, June 14, 2021

Cancer drug shows potential against pseudo SARS-CoV-2 in lab tests

In continuation of my update on Lenalidomide

Despite the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, treatments are still needed to combat this disease, which has killed millions of people and still kills thousands each day across the world. Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine conducted lab experiments showing how the cancer drug lenalidomide disrupts a cellular pathway in human cells so that pseudo-viruses derived from SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—cannot enter cells to cause infection.




The research, published in a letter to the journal Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, shows the potential of an existing FDA-approved drug to help doctors treat the sickest COVID-19 patients.

The labs of Pengda Liu, Ph.D., and Guochun Jiang, Ph.D., both assistant professors in the UNC Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, conducted this work. Liu is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Jiang is a member of the UNC HIV Cure Center.

SARS-CoV-2, a novel coronavirus and the causative agent of COVID-19, has caused a global social and economic disruption, and there are still thousands of cases and death each day in the United States and around the world. Treatments to prevent severe illness and death are still needed.

In this research letter, the UNC team reported that a  called E3 ligase SPOP recognizes and protects the human cell surface receptor ACE2, which is the protein SARS-CoV-2 latches onto in order to gain entry into  to cause infection. Another protein called CK1 kinase triggers this recognition and protection of ACE2.

The researchers used the cancer drug lenalidomide to inhibit CK1 kinase activity in cell cultures and showed a substantial reduction in ACE2 protein levels in kidney cancer cells. Researchers used SARS-CoV-2 S protein conditioned pseudoviruses in vitro and found lenalidomide treatment reduced the effect of this infection on kidney-derived cells.

"We hope that our identification and tests for the efficacy of inactivating the SPOP/CKI signaling in reducing ACE2 protein expression to attenuate SARS-CoV-2 infection provides a timely investigation into new therapeutic directions to combat COVID-19," Liu said.

A next step could be to use animal models to see if the drug blocks real SARS-CoV-2.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenalidomide


Cancer drug shows potential against pseudo SARS-CoV-2 in lab tests

Friday, May 6, 2016

Lenalidomide trials show potential for expanding lymphoma, leukaemia indications

Lenalidomide2DACS2.svg

Positive findings from two clinical trials have been published for the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide in patients with heavily pretreated mantle cell lymphoma, and in adults with T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma or peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

The results of the phase II MCL-002 (SPRINT) study suggest that, compared with an investigator's choice of treatment, lenalidomide 25 mg/day on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma who were ineligible for intensive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

After a median of 15.9 months, the 170 lenalidomide-treated patients had a median PFS of 8.7 months compared with 5.2 months in the 84 patients who were treated with single-agent rituximab, gemcitabine, fludarabine, chlorambucil or cytarabine, giving a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.61.

Monday, January 19, 2015

Three-drug combination produces better results in multiple myeloma patients



Dexamethasone structure.svgLenalidomide2DACS2.svgCarfilzomib.svg





In continuation of my update on dexamethasone, lenalidomide and  carfilzomib (above respective structures from left to right)....

In the treatment of multiple myeloma, the addition of carfilzomib to a currently accepted two-drug combination produced significantly better results than using the two drugs alone, according to a worldwide research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic.
Their findings will be reported online Dec. 6 in the New England Journal of Medicine, and presented on Dec. 7 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), held in San Francisco.

Interim analysis of the ASPIRE clinical trial, which enrolled 792 patients with relapsed multiple myeloma from 20 countries, found an "unprecedented" prolongation of the time patients were free of disease progression, says the study's lead investigator, Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B, a Mayo Clinic oncologist in Arizona. "Patients taking three drugs -- carfilzomib, lenalidomide and dexamethasone -- stayed free of disease progression for 26 months on average," he says. "No one has reported anything like this before for relapsed multiple myeloma."

Researchers found that adding carfilzomib to standard treatment (lenalidomide and dexamethasone) resulted in 8.7 months of longer remission, almost 50 percent longer than the standard two-drug combination (26.3 months versus 17.6 months).

The number of patients who responded to treatment was also significantly improved by adding carfilzomib to standard treatment -- 87.4 percent versus 66.9 percent-- and more than three times more patients had no detectable disease after the three-drug treatment (31.8 percent versus 9.3 percent). Although results were preliminary, there was also a trend toward improved overall survival, Dr. Stewart says. "Importantly, patients on the three-drug cocktail also reported a better quality of life despite a higher intensity of treatment," he says.

These findings highlight increasing success in treating myeloma, the second most common blood cancer, says Dr. Stewart.

"Survival of multiple myeloma has almost doubled over the last decade, and the very positive outcomes from use of the three-drug combination will likely further improve outcomes," he says. "This is a nice story to tell."
Lenalidomide, a potent derivative of thalidomide, affects immune system function. Dexamethasone is a steroid drug. Carfilzomib is a proteasome inhibitor approved for use in 2012 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for patients with advanced, end-stage multiple myeloma. The drug specifically targets regulation of the proteins that fuel growth of multiple myeloma.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Phase III study: REVLIMID meets primary endpoint in patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma

In continuation of my update on lenalidomide

Celgene International Sàrl, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ: CELG), recently announced that its phase III study (MM-020/IFM 07-01) of REVLIMID®(lenalidomide) in combination with dexamethasone in patients newly diagnosed withmultiple myeloma met its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS). In the study, a doublet regimen of continuous oral lenalidomide in combination with low-dose dexamethasone (Rd) demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in PFS compared to patients receiving a comparator arm with a triplet regimen consisting of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT).

Friday, November 11, 2016

Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients


In continuation of my updates on Dexamethasone,  Plitidepsin and  Bortezomib 








PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) announces the positive results from a Phase I study of plitidepsin in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. Dr María Victoria Mateos, MD of the Hematological Department of the University Hospital of Salamanca, Spain, the principal investigator of the study, will present the results in an oral session on June 3rd, 2016 during the 52nd Congress of the American Society of the Clinical Oncology (ASCO), taking place in Chicago (USA), June 3 - 7.

The primary objective of this 20-patient study was to identify the recommended dose for the triple combination (dexamethasone / bortezomib / plitidepsin) administered every four weeks. Efficacy and the safety profile were also evaluated. The overall response rate (ORR) was 56%, including very good partial responses (VGPR) in 33% of the patients and a remarkable partial remission in one triple refractory patient. The median progression free survival (PFS) was 8.3 months. Additionally, 90% of the patients showed a DOR of 6 months or more and clinical benefit was observed in 72% of the patients.

Dose limiting toxicities were not seen in any of the evaluated patients; therefore, the full dose of plitidepsin and bortezomib when used alone were established as the recommended dose for the triple combination. The treatment was well tolerated. The hematological toxicity was manageable and the non-hematological toxicity was in general mild, with the exception of one case of creatinine increase.
Out of the 20 patients that participated in the study, 10 are still under the treatment. The median age was 65. All patients had relapsed after previously receiving, on average, 3.5 therapeutic regimens (range 1-10). Forty-five percent of these patients had been subject to a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (8 autologous, 1 allogeneic). Of the 18 patients evaluable for efficacy, 83% (15 patients) had previously received bortezomib and lenalidomide. One was refractory to bortezomib and seven to lenalidomide.

In abstract #8006, Dr María Victoria Mateos and her team explain that despite the recent progress in the treatment of multiple myeloma due to the introduction of proteasome inhibitors (PIs), the new immunomodulatory drugs (IMIDs), and monoclonal antibodies, the illness is still incurable. Therefore, active compounds with novel mechanisms of action and adequate safety profile are needed. Plitidepsin targets the eukaryotic Elongation Factor eEF1A2, an overexpressed protein in multiple myeloma that contributes to its pathogenesis. The positive results from this study will be added to the already extensive data package from Phase II and Phase III trials, where plitidepsin has shown activity and a favorable safety profile in combination with dexamethasone.

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Takeda receives FDA approval for NINLARO (ixazomib) capsules to treat patients with multiple myeloma



Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE: 4502) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved NINLARO® (ixazomib) capsules, the first and only oral proteasome inhibitor, indicated in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. NINLARO is a once-weekly pill.

Takeda submitted a New Drug Application for NINLARO to the FDA in July 2015, and in September NINLARO was granted Priority Review status with a PDUFA date of March 10, 2016, reflecting the profound and continuing unmet need for new treatments for multiple myeloma, a devastating, relapsing and incurable rare cancer.

“With the approval of NINLARO, we can now offer patients a once-weekly oral proteasome inhibitor as part of a highly active triplet therapy,” said Paul Richardson, M.D., Clinical Program Leader and Director of Clinical Research, Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center Institute Physician at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and investigator for TOURMALINE-MM1, the pivotal Phase 3 trial on which today’s approval is based. “We, as investigators of the TOURMALINE-MM1 trial, felt it was vital to conduct a comprehensive ‘real world’ evaluation of this combination that included some of the most common patient types in the relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma setting, such as older patients, patients with moderate renal impairment, light chain disease, and high risk cytogenetics. Further, we treated patients until disease progression to determine the sustainability of NINLARO in treating their relapsed/refractory disease. The TOURMALINE-MM1 data demonstrate convincingly that oral NINLARO-based triplet treatment is effective at extending progression-free survival, over and above the clinical benefit seen with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, with a tolerable safety profile.”

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Ixazomib’s phase 3 study in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma presented



Ixazomib.svg


Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited today announced that it will present Phase 3 data from the TOURMALINE-MM1 ixazomib clinical trial at the 57th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting to be held in Orlando, Florida from December 5 to 8, 2015.

A total of 19 company-sponsored abstracts representing the breadth and depth of Takeda’s hematology-oncology portfolio were accepted for presentation at this year’s meeting.

We are particularly looking forward to this year’s ASH annual meeting. We will be presenting pivotal data on the ixazomib program, as well as the five year overall survival data for ADCETRIS in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

The success of these two programs, in addition to data we will be presenting on VELCADE and our pipeline, is the realization of decades of commitment to patients with hematological malignancies.

Dixie-Lee Esseltine, MD, FRCPC, Vice President, Oncology Therapeutic Area Unit, Takeda.
“This is the first time Phase 3 data will be presented for ixazomib, an oral, once-weekly proteasome inhibitor which, if approved, would enable the first all-oral triplet regimen containing a proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma,” said TOURMALINE-MM1 Principal Investigator Philippe Moreau, M.D., University of Nantes, France.

“In working with Takeda Oncology on the evolution of proteasome inhibition, we continue to strive towards providing new options to address the unmet needs of patients with multiple myeloma.”

Ixazomib is the first oral proteasome inhibitor in late stage clinical development. The TOURMALINE-MM1 study is an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 clinical trial which was designed to evaluate the superiority of once-a-week oral ixazomib plus lenalidomide and dexamethasone vs. placebo plus lenalidomide and dexamethasone in adult patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma.

Ixazomib has been granted Priority Review from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Accelerated Assessment by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency , respectively, validating the profound and continuing unmet need for new multiple myeloma treatments.

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Drug combination highly effective for newly diagnosed myeloma patients......

A three-drug combination treatment for the blood cancer multiple myeloma compares favorably to the best established therapy for newly diagnosed patients, according to a multi-center study led by Andrzej Jakubowiak, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the multiple myeloma program at the University of Chicago Medical Center.




( Carfilzomib)





 (Lenalidomide)






( Thalidomide)




The combination includes an investigational medicine called carfilzomib combined with two standard medications: lenalidomide, an analogue of thalidomide, and low-dose dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory with anti-cancer properties.

"This combination appears to deliver everything we expected and more," said Jakubowiak, who came to the University of Chicago this fall from the University of Michigan. "We have seen excellent efficacy — the best reported to date — without the neurotoxicity that has been problematic with other drug combinations."

Ref : http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2011/20111206-myeloma.html



Saturday, August 11, 2012

Three-drug regimen provides rapid, durable responses for multiple myeloma

In continuation of my update on three drug combination
A three-drug treatment for the blood cancer multiple myeloma provided rapid, deep and potentially durable responses, researchers report today online in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, and yesterday, Sunday, June 3, 2012, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, USA.

The researchers, led by Andrzej J. Jakubowiak, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the multiple myeloma program at the University of Chicago Medical Center, found that combining carfilzomib, a next generation proteasome inhibitor, with two standard drugs -- lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone compared favorably to other frontline regimens.
The longer patients stayed on the therapy, the better their response. After at least eight 28-day cycles of treatment, 61 percent of the 36 patients who remained on the therapy had a stringent complete response, defined as no detectable tumor cells or myeloma protein in the blood or bone marrow; 78 percent had at least a near complete response. More than 90 percent of patients had no progression of their disease at two years.
"These rapid and durable response rates are higher than those achieved by the best established regimens for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma," said Jakubowiak. "We have observed excellent efficacy, the best reported to date, and very good tolerability, including limited peripheral neuropathy that has been problematic with other drug combinations."

 Ref : http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2012/20120604-myeloma.html

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Onyx receives FDA approval for Kyprolis to treat multiple myeloma

 In continuation of my update on  Kyprolis.......

Onyx receives FDA approval for Kyprolis to treat multiple myeloma: The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) today announced that its partner, Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least two prior therapies, including Velcade (bortezomib) for Injection and an immunomodulatory agent, such as Thalomid (thalidomide) or Revlimid (lenalidomide), and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of the last therapy.....

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Promising treatment for aggressive lymphoma identified in new study

In continuation of my update on Lenalidomide... I found this info interesting to share with...

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

New three-drug combination for multiple myeloma ! ...

The regimen, known as RVD, combined the drugs Revlimid - (lenalidomide), Velcade - (bortezomib) and dexamethasone, which previously were found to be highly effective in multiple myeloma patients who had relapsed or no longer responded to first-line therapies.

Fifteen of the 35 newly diagnosed patients in the open-label phase 2 portion of the study subsequently underwent autologous (using their own blood-forming stem cells) transplants, a standard treatment for multiple myeloma and did very well.

For the entire group, after a median 19.3 months of follow up, the median time-to-progression (TTP) of the disease, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) had not yet been reached, according to the presentation. The estimated TTP and PFS at one year are 76 percent, and the estimated one-year overall survival is 100 percent, the results showed.

The more interesting part of the study is that the high response rate was not affected by the specific genetic characteristics of the patients' disease. Patients with so-called "adverse cytogenetics" are at higher risk for treatment failure and death, but in the current study the drug combination worked as well for them as it did in patients with more favorable cytogenetic features.

Except for the main adverse effect, peripheral neuropathy (numbness or pain in the extremities), which typically cleared up after dosages were lowered and the treatment was completed.

The combination has now gone into large phase 3 clinical trials, and the researchers think that this regimen has the potential to be a new standard of treatment in multiple myeloma....

http://www.dana-farber.org/abo/news/press/2009/multiple-myeloma-patients-experience-high-response-rate-with-new-three-drug-combination.html