Showing posts sorted by relevance for query berry. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query berry. Sort by date Show all posts

Friday, July 27, 2012

Ancient berry could protect against diabetic retinopathy

In continuation of my update on wolfberry

Ancient berry could protect against diabetic retinopathy: The ancient Tibetan goji berry could help fight blindness caused by long-term diabetes according to studies conducted by University of Sydney researchers.

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Berry fruits help the brain stay healthy in several ways


Berry fruits help the brain stay healthy in several ways: Strong scientific evidence exists that eating blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and other berry fruits has beneficial effects on the brain and may help prevent age-related memory loss and other changes, scientists report.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Animal studies examine role of raspberry products in weight management and motor function

Image result for red raspberries Image result for red raspberries


The latest issue of the Journal of Berry Research includes two new animal studies that investigate the effects of raspberry consumption in helping to support healthy weight and motor function (strength, balance and coordination). Future studies are needed to support the results found in these studies.

One-cup of frozen red raspberries has only 80 calories, is an excellent source of vitamin C, and provides nine grams of fiber (more fiber than any other berry). Like most berries, raspberries are a low-glycemic index food. Raspberries contain phytochemicals, such as ellagic acid, quercetin, gallic acid, cyanidins, pelargonidins, catechins, kaempferol and salicylic acid.

Animal and cellular studies examining how phytochemicals may work at the molecular level suggest that certain phytochemicals may help slow age-related declines. Age is the number one risk factor for many chronic diseases. Likewise, obesity is a major risk factor for chronic disease. These latest animal studies examine two important areas of health where raspberry products may play a role in weight management and also support motor function.

OBESITY

An animal study conducted by researchers at Oregon State University found that when added to a high-fat, high-sucrose diet, raspberry products and raspberry phytochemicals were found to significantly decrease weight gain associated with a high-fat, high calorie diet. Raspberry juice and raspberry puree concentrates were provided at 10% of total energy (the equivalent of 200 calories in a 2,000 calorie diet), and a combination of ellagic acid and raspberry ketone were provided at 0.2% weight/weight.

In the study, 76 male mice were divided into the following diets: a low-fat control group (10% calories from fat), a high-fat control group (45% calories from fat) and seven "high-fat treatment" groups that included a high-fat diet plus either raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, raspberry ketone and a combination of equal parts of ellagic acid and raspberry ketone.

"The addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate and the combination of ellagic acid plus raspberry ketones to the high fat diet significantly reduced weight gain observed in the high-fat fed mice," said Dr. Neil Shay, Principal Investigator. "In the case of the high-fat and raspberry juice concentrate diet, weight gain was reduced to a level that was statistically equivalent to the weight gain of the low-fat fed mice, despite the fact that all high-fat fed groups consumed the same amount of calories and more energy than the low-fat control group throughout the study."

The researchers concluded that the intake of a reasonable level of some raspberry food products may influence some of the metabolic consequences of consuming a high-fat, high-calorie diet in the development of obesity in male mice.

"We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," said Dr. Shay.

MOTOR FUNCTION

Researchers from the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University evaluated the effectiveness of a red raspberry-supplemented diet on age-sensitive measures of learning, memory and motor performance in older rats.

In this 10-week study, red raspberry supplementation was found to significantly improve motor skills. Specifically, compared to rats fed a standard well-balanced diet, rats fed a diet supplemented with freeze-dried raspberry extract performed better on tests which measured psychomotor coordination and balance, as well as tests that measure muscle tone, strength, and stamina.

"These results may have important implications for healthy aging," said lead researcher Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."

Friday, April 16, 2010

Chinese Wolfberries (as dietary supplement) may improve vision imperfections caused by Type-2 diabetes..

Wolfberry, commercially called goji berry, is the common name for the  fruit of two very closely related species: Lycium barbarum. 


It is also known as Chinese wolfberry, mede berry, barbary matrimony vine, bocksdorn, Duke of Argyll's tea tree, Murali (in India), red medlar, or matrimony vine.  Unrelated to the plant's geographic origin, the names Tibetan goji and Himalayan goji are in common use in the health food market for products from this plant.

Marketing literature for wolfberry products including several "goji juices" suggest that wolfberry polysaccharides have extensive biological effects and health benefits, although none of these claims have been supported by peer-reviewed research.

Interestingly, now Dingbo "Daniel" Lin a researcher from Kansas State University, is studying wolfberries and their potential to improve damage to the retina. His findings show that the fruit can lower the oxidative stress that the eye undergoes as a result of type-2 diabetes.

Lin and his colleagues have found that wolfberries have high levels of zeaxanthin, lutein, polysaccharides and polyphenolics, which have been shown to improve vision, including the prevention of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. 

By using type-2 diabetic mice, the researchers are studying the effects of wolfberries on oxidative stress, one of the factors that occurs in diabetic retinopathy.
"I would not say that wolfberries are a medicine, but they can be used as a dietary supplement to traditional treatments to improve vision," Lin said. "Wolfberries have high antioxidant activity and are very beneficial to protect against oxidative stress caused by environmental stimuli and genetic mutations."

Ref : http://www.k-state.edu/media/newsreleases/mar10/wolfberry33010.html

Saturday, May 18, 2019

FDA Approves Dovato (dolutegravir/lamivudine) for HIV-1 Infection

In continuation of my update on Dolutegravir & Lamivudine



Dolutegravir.svg
Dolutegravir (DTG)

Lamivudine structure.svg
Lamivudine, commonly called 3TC

ViiV Healthcare  announced the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Dovato, a complete, once-daily, single-tablet regimen of dolutegravir (DTG) 50 mg and lamivudine (3TC) 300 mg for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults with no antiretroviral (ARV) treatment history and with no known resistance to either DTG or 3TC. Dovato, a two-drug regimen (2DR), reduces exposure to the number of ARVs from the start of treatment, while still maintaining the efficacy and high barrier to resistance of a traditional DTG-based three-drug regimen.
Deborah Waterhouse, CEO, ViiV Healthcare, said: “Building on our innovative portfolio of medicines, Dovato is powered by dolutegravir, an antiretroviral included in multiple combination therapies and the most prescribed integrase inhibitor in the world, 2 coupled with the established profile of lamivudine. With Dovato, the first complete, single-tablet, two-drug regimen for treatment-naïve adults, ViiV Healthcare is delivering what patients are requesting—a chance to treat their HIV-1 infection with as few drugs as possible, marking a significant step in HIV treatment.”
The approval of Dovato is supported by the landmark global GEMINI 1 and 2 studies that included more than 1,400 HIV-1 infected adults. In these studies, DTG + 3TC demonstrated non-inferiority based on plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per milliliter (c/mL), a standard measure of HIV-1 control, at Week 48 when compared to a three-drug regimen of DTG and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC), in treatment-naïve, HIV-1 infected adults. The safety results for DTG + 3TC seen in GEMINI 1 and 2 were consistent with the product labelling for DTG and 3TC. No patient who experienced virologic failure in either treatment arm developed treatment-emergent resistance.
Pedro Cahn, principal investigator for the GEMINI study program said: “People are now living longer with HIV and will spend a lifetime taking drugs to suppress their virus. The approval of the fixed dose combination of dolutegravir and lamivudine, a complete, single-tablet, two-drug regimen, marks a pivotal moment in the treatment of HIV-1. Treatment-naïve people living with the virus have a powerful option that delivers non-inferior efficacy to a dolutegravir-based three-drug regimen, allowing them to take fewer ARVs and get and remain suppressed.”
Jeff Berry, Test Positive Aware Network (TPAN), said: “The approval of Dovato is a welcome paradigm shift, as it brings an innovative treatment approach to newly diagnosed adults with HIV-1. By exposing patients to fewer drugs at the start of treatment, the hope is to help address concerns arising from overall management of prolonged ARV therapy.”
DTG/3TC as a complete, once-daily, single-tablet, two-drug regimen for HIV-1 therapy is currently under review by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and regulatory authorities in Canada, Australia, Switzerland, and South Africa and several additional submissions are planned throughout 2019.

About Dovato (dolutegravir/lamivudine)

Dovato is approved as a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults with no known antiretroviral treatment history and with no known substitutions associated with resistance to either dolutegravir or lamivudine. Dovato is a once-daily, single-tablet, two-drug regimen that combines the integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) dolutegravir (Tivicay, 50 mg) with the nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) lamivudine (Epivir, 300 mg).
Like a DTG-based three-drug regimen, Dovato uses only two drugs to inhibit the viral cycle at two different sites. INSTIs, like dolutegravir, inhibit HIV replication by preventing the viral DNA from integrating into the genetic material of human immune cells (T-cells). This step is essential in the HIV replication cycle and is also responsible for establishing chronic infection. Lamivudine is an NRTI that works by interfering with the conversion of viral RNA into DNA which in turn stops the virus from multiplying.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolutegravir
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamivudine

Monday, February 19, 2018

One hundred percent fruit juice does not alter blood sugar levels


The results are consistent with prior studies which have shown that consumption of 100% fruit juice is not linked to increasing risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It also supports a growing body of evidence that fruit juice has no significant impact on glycemic control.
The study involved comprehensive data analysis that quantitatively evaluated the correlation between consumption of 100% juice and blood glucose control.
The systematic review involved a meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials (RCT) and assessed the effect that 100% juice from fruits like apple, citrus, berry, pomegranate, and grape, has on fasting blood insulin and blood glucose levels. This was used as a biomarker for diabetes risk.
According to The American Diabetes Association, more than 90% of the 29 million cases in adults and children in the United States fall in the category of type 2 diabetes—a metabolic disorder where the body is incapable of responding to insulin.
Following a healthy lifestyle is the first line of defense for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet, regular physical exercise, and maintaining a healthy weight are also encouraged.
The US Dietary Guidelines state that  a healthy eating pattern should  include vegetables, fruits, low-fat or fat-free dairy, grains, and a variety of protein foods. A 4-oz. glass of 100% fruit juice could replace one serving (1/2 cup) of fruit, and can supplement whole fruit to help people add more nutrition to their diets.
Ref : https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/kc-n-nrf011718.php

Monday, December 7, 2015

Cranberry juice consumption may protect against cardiovascular disease

In continuation of my updates on Cranberries

Results from a new study presented at the Cranberry Health Research Conference preceding the annual Berry Health Benefits Symposium 2015 in Madison, WI, revealed that cranberry juice consumption may play a role in protecting against cardiovascular disease. Presented by principal investigator, Ana Rodriguez-Mateos, PhD, from the Division of Cardiology, Pulmonology and Vascular Medicine at the University Duesseldorf, Germany, the research uncovered a potent, dose-dependent relationship between cranberry juice and improved vascular function. Because vascular dysfunction, including limitations in blood flow, is a central feature in the development of atherosclerosis - improving vascular function can have a powerful, beneficial effect on a person's cardiovascular health.

"Cranberry juice is a rich source of phytonutrients, including proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins and phenolic acids," explains Dr. Rodriguez-Mateos. "Due to this robust profile of polyphenols, our team sought to evaluate the immediate vascular impact of drinking one, 450 ml (or 16 ounces) glass of cranberry juice with a different range of concentrations of cranberry-polyphenols."


Thursday, February 28, 2013

Positive health indicators associated with avocado consumption

We know that avocado (Persea americana) is a tree native to Central Mexico, classified in the flowering plant family Lauraceae along with cinnamon, camphor and bay laurel. Avocado or alligator pear also refers to the fruit (botanically a large berry that contains a single seed) of the tree.


Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world. They have a green-skinned, fleshy body that may be pear-shaped, egg-shaped, or spherical. Commercially, it ripens after harvesting. Trees are partially self-pollinating and often are propagated through grafting to maintain a predictable quality and quantity of the fruit.

The fruit of horticultural cultivars has a markedly higher fat content than most other fruit, mostly monounsaturated fat, and as such serves as an important staple in the diet of various groups where access to other fatty foods (high-fat meats and fish, dairy products, etc.) is limited.
A ripe avocado yields to gentle pressure when held in the palm of the hand and squeezed. The flesh is prone to enzymatic browning; it turns brown quickly after exposure to air. To prevent this, lime or lemon juice can be added to avocados after they are peeled.

Monday, May 7, 2012

Berries, Tea May Cut Men’s Odds for Parkinson’s Disease..


In continuation of my update on Flavonoids...

Regularly consumption of food and drink rich in substances called flavonoids, such as berries, apples, tea and red wine, can lower a man’s risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by 40 percent, new research suggests.

  “For total flavonoids, the beneficial result was only in men. But, berries are protective in both men and women,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Xiang Gao, a research scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health and an associate epidemiologist at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“Berries could be a neuroprotective agent. People can include berries in their regular diet. There are no harmful effects from berry consumption, and they lower the risk of hypertension too,” Gao added.

For the study, the researchers reviewed nutrition and health data from almost 50,000 men enrolled in the Health Professional Follow-Up Study and more than 80,000 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study.

The researchers looked at dietary intake of five major flavonoid sources: tea, berries, apples, orange juice and red wine.

Over 20 to 22 years of follow-up, 805 people developed Parkinson’s disease — 438 men and 367 women.

When researchers compared those who ate the most flavonoids with those who ate the least, they found that only men saw a statistically significant benefit, lowering their risk of Parkinson’s by 40 percent.

Gao said it wasn’t clear why only men benefited from the extra flavonoid intake, but he noted that other studies have also found differences between men and women. Gao said it’s not clear if there’s a biological mechanism causing these differences, or another factor.

But, when the researchers looked at the dietary compounds individually, it was clear that berries could benefit both men and women, lowering the risk of Parkinson’s disease by about 25 percent for those who had at least two servings of berries a week.

Gao said that anthocyanins protect the cells from oxidative damage and they also have an anti-inflammatory effect, which may be how berries help to reduce Parkinson’s risk.

The study findings should be interpreted cautiously because the participants were mostly white professionals, and the results might not apply to other ethnic groups. Also, recollections of dietary intake may be faulty, and it’s possible that other properties of fruits and vegetables might have influenced the results, the authors said.

But, he added, it’s important for people to realize that this research isn’t applicable to people who already have the disease.

He also said it will be important to confirm these findings in other studies and learn the mechanism of how berries and other flavonoids appear to offer some protection against Parkinson’s disease.


Thursday, October 6, 2011

Blueberry powder may control triple negative breast cancer

In continuation of my update on blue berry's usefulness....
Blueberry powder may control triple negative breast cancer: In several studies recently conducted at the Beckman Research Institute at the City of Hope, Duarte, CA researchers found that feeding blueberry powder to mice significantly reduced the growth and spread of triple negative breast cancer cells, a very aggressive form of cancer.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

ProstaCaid (33-ingredient comprehensive polyherbal preparation) against prostate cancer......

We have seen  many benefits of natural products rich in  Quercetin,   Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and many other polyphenol antioxidant from natural products like green tea, broccoli peaches and plums. Interestingly, now researchers from  Columbia University have come up with an interesting finding, i.e., ProstaCaid is a 33-ingredient comprehensive polyherbal preparation with supplements of vitamin C, vitamin D3, zinc, selenium, quercitin, 3,3′-diinodolymethane (DIM), and lycopene was able to stop abnormal cell growth and induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in both hormone sensitive and hormone resistant prostate cancer cell lines at unusually low concentrations, which makes the findings more significant...

Herbal extracts include the extracts from turmeric root, saw palmetto berry, grape skin, pomegranate, pumpkin seed, pygeum bark, sarsaparilla root, green tea, and Japanese knotweed. Hence, it is rich in natural polyphenols, including quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and ellagic acid, which have previously demonstrated anticancer potential. The unique formula contains 3 medicinal mushrooms grown on an herbal-enhanced medium. The mushrooms included are Phellinus linteus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Coriolus versicolor, each with known anticancer properties.

Researchers claim that, ProstaCaid was designed based on constituents that exhibit antiprolifetaive, antioxidant, and apoptotic activities; however, its efficacy and the mechanisms of action are yet to be examined. Researchers looked at the effectiveness of the preparation in suppressing several types of prostate cancer cell lines in culture and attempt to delineate the mechanism of action for justification in pursuing animal to determine efficicacy invivo.

Researchers conclude that, the anticancer activity of ProstaCaid may be ascribed to its polyphenolic flavonoids and curcuminoids derived from various herbs as well as other supplements, such as DIM. The preparation contains supplements such as quercetin (15%), Curcuma longa root extract complex with enhanced bioavailability (BCM-95; 20%), DIM (3%), and resveratrol (0.2%). Some of these components have shown a strong doseand time-dependent growth inhibition and apoptotic death in prostate cancer cells; 25 mM of quercetin inhibited about 50% PC3 cell growth for 72 hours. At 24 hours, 50 mM and 100 mM quercetin induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis, manifested by the decrease in G2/M-related protiens.

Researchers summarise  that,    ProstaCaid has anti-cancer activities in both AD and AI prostate cancer cells at very low concentrations (25 mg/mL). It also suggests that ProstaCaid inhibits cell growth and survival, at least through the inhibition of AKT and MAPK signaling. The effect on AI cell lines is especially of importance as there is presently no curative therapy for hormone refractory prostate cancer.

Researchers postulate that ProstaCaid may affect activity of Cdc2/cyclin B1 kinase by reducing this complex formation. Cdc2 could be dephosphorylated by Cdc25C and become inactive or be phosphorylated by protein kinase, such as Wee1, and then converted into an inactive form. They also suggest that more studies are needed in the future to test it and to define its upstream events in PC3 cells.

Ref : Jun Yan and Aaron E. Katz, Integr Cancer Ther 2010 9: 186

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Chokeberry extract reduces weight gain in insulin-resistant animals.....

Chokeberries (Aronia) are a great example of those fruits that both  taste good and show a number of health benefits for the body. Chokeberries' rich antioxidant content may be beneficial as a dietary preventative for reducing the risk of diseases caused by oxidative stress. Among the models under evaluation where preliminary results show benefits of chokeberry anthocyanins are colorectal cancer, chronic inflammation, gastric mucosal disorders (peptic ulcer),eye inflammation (uveitis) and liver failure cardiovascular disease.

Now Drs. Bolin Qin and Richard Anderson from the US Department of Agriculture in Beltsville, MD, have come up with some more interesting info about chokeberries, i.e., "chokeberry extract reduces weight gain in insulin-resistant animals". 

Qin and Anderson found that at the end of the study,  the rats consuming the chokeberry-spiked water weighed less than the controls; both levels of chokeberry had the same effect in this regard. Similar beneficial effects of chokeberry consumption were found for body fat (specifically, that of the lower abdominal region). They also discovered that animals that had been drinking chokeberry extract had lower blood glucose and reduced levels of plasma triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol when compared to the control animals. These alterations would theoretically lead to lower risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in humans.

To add even more evidence for a healthful impact of this super-berry, the researchers documented numerous alterations in expression of genes that would likely lead to reduced chronic inflammation and perhaps even lower cancer risk. For instance, drinking chokeberry extract lowered expression of the gene coding for interleukin-6 (IL-6), a protein that normally triggers inflammation following trauma or infection. Chronic overproduction of IL-6 has been documented in many diseases such as diabetes, arthritis, and atherosclerosis and is thought to be a partial cause of these conditions.

Researchers conclude that though human trials are essential to further substantiate their claim,  they believe their study "provides evidence that the chokeberry extract inhibits weight gain in insulin-resistant animals and that it modulates multiple genes associated with adipose tissue growth, blood glucose regulation, and inflammatory pathways."....



Ref : Bolin Qin and Richard A Anderson, :  Abstract in FASEB, 

(those interested can read other benefits and other details at the link)


Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Anti-aging products from Schisandra Chinesis..



Schisandra (Magnolia Vine) is a genus of shrub commonly grown in gardens. Species include S. chinensis, S. glaucescens, S. rubriflora and S. rubrifolia. (picture right side : Schisandra Chinensis). In traditional Chinese medicine it is used as a remedy for many ailments: to resist infections, increase skin health, and combat insomnia, coughing, and thirst.

Recently, Glissandra Skincare Inc, announced the launch of three anti-aging products. As per the claim by the company, the key ingredient is Glissandrin,™ an exclusive suite of powerful extracts from the Schisandra berry (see above picture).

In both in-vitro and in-vivo studies, the proprietary Glissandrin formulation has proven effective in improving the visible signs of skin aging. Glissandrin does not change the cells, it nourishes them with a unique combination of natural ingredients and advanced technology, thereby supporting the healthiness of the skin cells and helping to sustain their natural ability to combat the leading causes of skin aging.

Ref : http://www.glissandra.com/story.html