Showing posts sorted by relevance for query amoxicillin. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query amoxicillin. Sort by date Show all posts

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

New treatment kills off infection that can be deadly to cystic fibrosis patients


A new treatment developed by researchers at Aston University and Birmingham Children's Hospital has been found to completely kill a bacterial infection that can be deadly to cystic fibrosis patients and other chronic lung conditions such as bronchiectasis.

The findings, which are published in the journal Scientific Reports, show that scientists from Aston University, Mycobacterial Research Group, combined doses of three antibiotics—amoxicillin and imipenem-relebactam and found it was 100% effective in killing off the infection which is usually extremely difficult to treat in patients with cystic fibrosis. The infection results in severe decline in lung function and sometimes death.
Amoxicillin.svg                               Imipenem.svg 
amoxicillin                                                                   Imipenem  \


Relebactam structure.svg Relebactam
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic condition affecting more than 10,000 people in the UK (Cystic Fibrosis Trust) and there are more than 70,000 people with the condition worldwide (Cystic Fibrosis Foundation). While bronchiectasis affects 210,000 people in the UK (British Lung Foundation).
Mycobacterium abscessus is a bacterial pathogen from the same family that causes tuberculosis, which causes serious lung infections in people (particularly children) with lung disorders, most notably cystic fibrosis. It is highly drug resistant. Currently patients are given a cocktail of antibiotics that cause serious side effects including severe hearing loss and often doesn't result in cure.
The researchers used samples of the pathogen taken from 16 infected cystic fibrosis patients and tested the new drug combination to discover how much was required to kill the bacteria. They found the amounts of amoxicillin-imipenem-relebactam required were low enough to be given safely to patients.
Until now Mycobacterium abscessus has been virtually impossible to eradicate in people with cystic fibrosis. It can also be deadly if the patient requires a lung transplant because they are not eligible for surgery if the infection is present.
In the UK, of the 10,000 people living with cystic fibrosis, Mycobacterium abscessus infects 13% of all patients with the condition. This new treatment is advantageous not only because it kills off the infection, but it does not have any side-effects on patients, thus ensuring their quality of life and greatly improving survival chances for infected CF patients.
Dr. Jonathan Cox, Lecturer in Microbiology, Aston University and leader of the team that discovered this new treatment said: "This new drug combination is a significant step forward for patients with cystic fibrosis that get infected with the deadly Mycobacterium abscessus bacteria. Our new drug combination is significantly less toxic than those currently used, and so far we have managed to kill every patient's bacterial isolate that we have received.
"This shows our drugs, when used in combination, are widely effective and could therefore make a huge difference to people whose treatment options are currently limited.
"Because amoxicillin is already widely available and imipenem-relebactam has just been approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, these drugs are already available to clinicians. We therefore hope to start treating patients as soon as possible. "
The findings of this research will impact children being treated for the infection at Birmingham Children's Hospital—who part funded the research—but it can also be used nationally and further afield.
With more funding, the next stage of the research will be to test the treatment on more people with CF infected by this bacterium, comparing it to the antibiotics that are currently used.
Dr. Maya Desai, Consultant in Respiratory Paediatrics, Birmingham Children's Hospital added: "This exciting development will significantly impact on the care of CF patients globally. It has been possible only with close collaboration between Aston University and Birmingham Children's Hospital both from a clinical research and financial point of view."
Dr. Paula Sommer, Head of Research at the Cystic Fibrosis Trust said: "It's exciting that these lab-based studies investigating new antibiotic treatments for M. abscessus infection are showing such promise and adding to our expanding knowledge of this devastating bug.
"Mycobacterium abscessus also known as NTM, is the most feared  a person with cystic fibrosis can develop. Taking drugs to treat NTM can add to an already significant regime of daily treatments and take up to a year to clear infections. We look forward to a time when effective, short courses of treatment are available to treat NTM."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amoxicillin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imipenem                                                                                                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relebactam

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-10-fda-drug-common-cystic-fibrosis.html


Wednesday, February 26, 2020

FDA Approves Talicia (omeprazole magnesium, amoxicillin and rifabutin) for the Treatment of H. pylori Infection in Adults

In continuation of my update on omeprazole and amoxicillin   

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (Nasdaq: RDHL) (Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a specialty biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on the development and commercialization of proprietary drugs for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases,  announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Talicia (omeprazole magnesium, amoxicillin and rifabutin) delayed-release capsules 10 mg1/250 mg/12.5 mg for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in adults. RedHill expects to launch Talicia1 in the U.S. in the first quarter of 2020 with its dedicated sales force.
Talicia is the only rifabutin-based therapy approved for the treatment of H. pylori infection and is designed to address the high resistance of H. pylori bacteria to current clarithromycin-based standard-of-care therapies. It is estimated that H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin more than doubled between 2009-2013.
Professor David Y. Graham, MD, MACG, Professor of Medicine, Molecular Virology and Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston and Lead Investigator of the Talicia Phase 3 studies, said: “Talicia offers patients a much-needed new treatment option for H. pylori with an excellent safety and efficacy profile that is not compromised by clarithromycin or metronidazole resistance. The clinical studies for Talicia demonstrated high efficacy in eradication of H. pylori. Studies with Talicia found zero resistance to rifabutin and showed 17% resistance to clarithromycin, a current standard-of-care macrolide antibiotic, consistent with current data showing that clarithromycin-containing therapies fail in approximately 25-40% of cases.”
Colin W. Howden, MD, AGAF, FACG, Hyman Professor of Medicine & Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, added: “H. pylori is a major cause of peptic ulcer and gastritis. It is also carcinogenic and is the leading cause of gastric cancer. Treatment of H. pylori infection has become increasingly difficult due to growing bacterial resistance and the lack of advances in treatment options over the past decade. Talicia offers a new effective treatment option to overcome bacterial resistance and provide optimal efficacy and I believe it could become a recommended first-line standard-of-care treatment for H. pylori infection.”
“The FDA’s approval of Talicia demonstrates our unwavering dedication to patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases. We thank the patients, researchers and clinical staff who participated in the studies of Talicia and the RedHill team and vendors for this important milestone achieved by their commitment and hard work,” said Dror Ben-Asher, Chief Executive Officer of RedHill Biopharma. “We are working to expand our sales force to approximately 140 representatives who will promote Talicia, Aemcolo and other gastrointestinal-focused products in our basket.”

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

The antibiotic, amoxicillin-clavulanate, before a meal may improve small bowel motility

The antibiotic, amoxicillin-clavulanate, before a meal may improve small bowel motility: The common antibiotic, amoxicillin-clavulanate, may improve small bowel function in children experiencing motility disturbances, according to a new study.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Combinations of three antibiotics could help combat drug-resistant bacterial infections

Amoxicillin.svg

Each year, approximately 700,000 people die from drug-resistant bacterial infections. A study by UCLA life scientists could be a major step toward combating drug-resistant infections.

The research, reported in the journal Royal Society Interface, found that combinations of three different antibiotics can often overcome bacteria's resistance to antibiotics, even when none of the three antibiotics on their own -- or even two of the three together -- is effective.

The researchers grew E. coli bacteria in a laboratory and treated the samples with combinations of one, two and three antibiotics from a group of 14 drugs. The biologists studied how effectively every single possible combination of drugs worked to kill the bacteria.

Some combinations killed 100 percent of the bacteria, including 94 of the 364 three-drug groupings the researchers tested. According to said Pamela Yeh, the paper's senior author and a UCLA assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, the success rate might have been even greater if the researchers tested higher doses of the drugs.

Elif Tekin, the paper's lead author and a UCLA graduate student, helped create a sophisticated framework that enabled the scientists to determine when adding a third antibiotic was producing new effects that combinations of just two drugs couldn't achieve.

"Three antibiotics can change the dynamic," she said. "Not many scientists realize that three-drug combinations can have really beneficial effects that they would not have predicted even by studying all pairs of the antibiotics together."

Different classes of antibiotics use different mechanisms to fight bacteria. One class, which includes amoxicillin, kill bacteria by preventing them from making cell walls. Another disrupts their tightly coiled DNA. A third inhibits their ability to make proteins. But there had been little previous research indicating that combinations of three antibiotics might be more potent together than any two of them.
"People tend to think that you don't need to understand interactions beyond pairs," said Van Savage, a co-author of the paper and a UCLA associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and of biomathematics. "We found that isn't always so."

The researchers combined techniques from biology and mathematics to determine which groups of antibiotics would be most effective.

"The three antibiotics must be chosen systematically and rationally," Yeh said.

In addition to identifying certain combinations that were more potent than the researchers expected, the analysis revealed that adding a third antibiotic sometimes made the drug combination less potent -- sometimes much less so, she said.

Yeh said the findings could be one weapon to fight what has become a major public health risk, but overcoming drug resistance will require a full arsenal.

"We need sound policy to stop the overuse of antibiotics, doctors to prescribe antibiotics wisely, agriculture to stop overusing antibiotics and researchers to develop new antibiotics," she said. "We need to attack this problem from all sides. We think our contribution will buy time for researchers to better leverage existing drugs and for policymakers to develop better policy about the use of antibiotics."

Another benefit of three-drug combinations is that they could allow doctors to prescribe lower doses of each antibiotic, which could reduce side effects.

The researchers plan to make available open-access software that would let other scientists and clinicians decide which combinations of antibiotics will be most effective.

Yeh said the team's approach could also be used to study how four or more pharmaceuticals interact, and a similar mathematical framework could be used to better understand climate change (for example, to understand how temperature, rainfall, humidity and acidity of the oceans interact) and other scientific questions that have three or more key factors.

Ref : http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/13/119/20160332

Monday, April 9, 2018

Research shows link between fluoroquinolone antibiotics and increased risk of aortic disease


New research from a Swedish and Danish team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet lend additional support to a link between treatment with fluoroquinolone antibiotics and an increased risk of acute aortic disease. The study is published in the esteemed journal The BMJ.
Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are used globally to treat a variety of infections. Recent observational studies have raised concerns that they may be associated with a more than twofold increase in the risk of acute and life-threatening aortic disease (aortic aneurysm or dissection). However, due to limitations in study design, it has not been possible to draw firm conclusions.
To assess whether there actually is a link, researchers from Karolinska Institutet and Lund University in Sweden and Statens Serum Institut in Denmark analysed data from Swedish national health registers. The researchers were then able to compare the risk of aortic aneurysm or dissection among more than 360,000 treatment episodes of fluoroquinolones with the risk among the same number of treatment episodes of amoxicillin, another type of antibiotic.

Sunday, July 1, 2012

Pernix Therapeutics introduces Omeclamox-Pak® for the treatment of H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease

Pernix Therapeutics introduces Omeclamox-Pak® for the treatment of H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease: Pernix Therapeutics Holdings, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company,  announced the introduction of Omeclamox-Pak®, a ten-day therapy of omeprazole (below 1st) delayed-release capsules (20 mg), clarithromycin (below 2nd) tablets (500 mg) and amoxicillin (below 3rd) capsules (500 mg) for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and duodenal ulcer disease (active or one-year history) to eradicate H. pylori in adult patients...


Wednesday, January 27, 2010

LOAD - a better combination therapy against Helicobater pylori....

In continuation of my update on Helicobater pylori infection and its treatment, I found this info interesting to share with. Dr. Patrick Basu and his colleagues at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons found that,  a shorter course of the four-drug combination (LOAD), seven days vs. a ten-day treatment, is equally effective. As per the claim by the researchers  Helicobater pylori, a bacteria implicated in peptic ulcers and gastritis, was eradicated in 95 percent patients who took a 7-day course of combination therapy with  levofloxacin (L), omeprazole (O), nitazoxanide (Alinia®) (A) and doxycycline  (D) (LOAD) compared to eradication in only 80.9 percent of patients on lansoprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin (LAC) for seven days.

The study included 135 patients with treatment naïve Helicobacter pylori infection, who were randomized to LOAD (7 or 10 days) vs. LAC (10 days). There was a total wash out period of six weeks from any prior antibiotic and PPI use prior to the initiation of therapy.


Ref : http://www.acg.gi.org/media/releases/09ACGReleaseLOADTherapyforHPylori.pdf