Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Ruxolitinib. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Ruxolitinib. Sort by date Show all posts

Friday, September 11, 2015

JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib shows promise in treating CMML patients


Ruxolitinib2DACS.svg


In continuation of my update on Ruxolitinib


Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare type of myelodysplastic, myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by increased numbers of peripheral monocytes and less than 20 percent blasts. CMML has few treatment options and patients only survive on average for 12 to 24 months. Preclinical studies suggest that JAK2 inhibitors may be an effective treatment option for CMML. Eric Padron, M.D., assistant member of the Malignant Hematology Program at Moffitt Cancer Center will report on the first phase 1 study of the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in CMML patients at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.

The Moffitt team and their collaborators performed a dose-escalation study of ruxolitinib in 19 CMLL patients. Ruxolitinib displayed minimal toxicity, with no dose-limiting toxicities observed and only one grade 3 or higher adverse event.

Efficacy data suggest that ruxolitinib is a promising treatment option for CMML patients. Out of fifteen patients who were evaluable for response, 3 displayed hematologic improvement and 1 patient had a partial response. Nine of the patients entered the trial with an enlarged spleen, and 5 of these patients had a greater than 50 percent reduction in their spleen size.

Ruxolitinib may be particularly beneficial for patients who have B symptoms, as 10 out of 11 patients with disease related symptoms had a clinically meaningful or complete resolution of their symptoms.

The researchers determined a phase 2 recommended dose of 20 mg twice a day, and a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in CMML patients is planned.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

FDA Approves Jakafi (ruxolitinib) for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease


In continuation of my update  on ruxolitinib


Ruxolitinib.svg


Incyte Corporation   announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Jakafi (ruxolitinib) for the treatment of steroid-refractory acute GVHD in adult and pediatric patients 12 years and older. Jakafi is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for this indication.
“For the first time, patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD, and the physicians that treat them, have an FDA-approved treatment for this serious disease,” stated HervĂ© Hoppenot, Chief Executive Officer, Incyte. “This approval is also an important milestone for Incyte, as it marks the third indication for Jakafi in the United States, further underscoring Incyte’s commitment to delivering innovative medicines for patients in need. We are proud of the impact Jakafi has had on patients’ lives to-date and are dedicated to advancing our ongoing research in JAK inhibition to serve more GVHD patients in the future.”
The approval was based on data from REACH1, an open-label, single-arm, multicenter study of Jakafi in combination with corticosteroids in patients with steroid-refractory grade II-IV acute GVHD. Of the 71 patients recruited into REACH1, 49 patients were refractory to steroids alone, 12 patients had received two or more prior anti-GVHD therapies and 10 patients did not otherwise meet the FDA definition of steroid-refractory. Jakafi was administered at 5 mg twice daily, and the dose could be increased to 10 mg twice daily after three days in the absence of toxicity.
The efficacy of Jakafi was evaluated based upon Day 28 overall response rate (ORR), defined as a complete response (CR), very good partial response or partial response based on the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) criteria. The Day 28 ORR in the 49 patients refractory to steroids alone was 57 percent with a CR rate of 31 percent. The most frequently reported adverse reactions among all 71 study participants were infections (55 percent) and edema (51 percent), and the most common laboratory abnormalities were anemia (75 percent), thrombocytopenia (75 percent) and neutropenia (58 percent).
GVHD is a condition that can occur after an allogeneic stem cell transplant (the transfer of stem cells from a donor) where the donated cells initiate an immune response and attack the transplant recipient’s organs, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. There are two major forms of GVHD, acute and chronic, that can affect multiple organ systems including the skin, gastrointestinal (digestive) tract and liver. Patients who develop steroid-refractory acute GVHD can progress to severe disease, with one-year mortality rates of approximately 70 percent.1
“Every year in the United States, about half of the people who develop acute GVHD do not respond adequately to steroids, making it an extremely challenging disease to treat,” said Madan Jagasia, M.B.B.S., M.S., M.M.H.C., a lead investigator on the REACH1 trial and Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology and Chief Medical Officer, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. “While allogeneic stem cell transplants have the potential to transform people’s lives, the onset of acute GVHD can significantly impact their prognosis. I am excited that we now have Jakafi as a new treatment option for acute GVHD patients that do not respond to corticosteroids who, until now, have had limited choices.”
Previously, the FDA granted Jakafi Breakthrough Therapy Designation and Orphan Drug Designation for the treatment of patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD, and the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) was reviewed under the FDA’s Priority Review program.
Jakafi will be made available to appropriate patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD immediately. Incyte is committed to supporting patients and removing barriers to access medicines. Eligible patients in the U.S. who are prescribed Jakafi have access to IncyteCARES (Connecting to Access, Reimbursement, Education and Support), a comprehensive program offering patient support, including financial assistance and ongoing education and resources to eligible patients.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruxolitinib

Saturday, December 4, 2021

FDA Approves Opzelura (ruxolitinib) Cream for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis (AD)

In continuation of my update on Opzelura (ruxolitinib)  , Incyte (Nasdaq:INCY)announced  the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  approval Opzelura™ (ruxolitinib) cream for the short-term and non-continuous chronic treatment of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis (AD) in non-immunocompromised patients 12 years of age and older whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies, or when those therapies are not advisable. Opzelura is the first and only topical formulation of a JAK inhibitor approved in the United States. Research shows dysregulation of the JAK-STAT pathway contributes to key features of AD such as itch, inflammation and skin barrier dysfunction.




“Atopic dermatitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease that can be challenging to manage. Many patients do not respond well to existing treatments and have uncontrolled disease,” said Jonathan Silverberg, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor of Dermatology and Director of Clinical Research and Contact Dermatitis at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. “As a clinician, I am excited to have a non-steroidal topical cream like Opzelura.”

“The approval of Opzelura is an important advancement in the treatment of AD, and we are pleased to offer a novel topical treatment option that targets a pathway believed to be a source of inflammation,” said HervĂ© Hoppenot, Chief Executive Officer, Incyte. “At Incyte, we are committed to transforming the treatment of immune-mediated dermatologic conditions like AD. We look forward to bringing Opzelura to the patient community and also continuing to explore its potential in other challenging skin diseases.”

The FDA approval was based on data from the TRuE-AD (Topical Ruxolitinib Evaluation in Atopic Dermatitis) clinical trial program, consisting of two randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled Phase 3 studies (TRuE-AD1 and TRuE-AD 2) evaluating the safety and efficacy of Opzelura in more than 1,200 adolescents and adults with mild to moderate AD. Results from the studies showed patients experienced significantly clearer skin and itch reduction when treated with Opzelura cream 1.5% twice daily (BID), compared to vehicle (non-medicated cream):

  • Significantly more patients treated with Opzelura achieved Investigator’s Global Assessment (IGA) Treatment Success (IGA-TS, primary endpoint) at Week 8 (defined as an IGA score of 0 [clear] or 1 [almost clear] with at least a 2-point improvement from baseline): 53.8% in TRuE-AD1 and 51.3% in TRuE-AD2, compared to vehicle (15.1% in TRuE-AD1, 7.6% in TRuE-AD2; P<0.0001).
  • Significantly more patients treated with Opzelura experienced a clinically meaningful reduction in itch from baseline at Week 8, as measured by a ≥4-point reduction in the itch Numerical Rating Scale (itch NRS4): 52.2% in TRuE-AD1 and 50.7% in TRuE-AD2, compared to vehicle (15.4% in TRuE-AD1, 16.3% in TRuE-AD2; P<0.0001), among patients with an NRS score of at least 4 at baseline.

In clinical trials, the most common (≥1%) treatment-emergent adverse reactions in patients treated with Opzelura were nasopharyngitis, diarrhea, bronchitis, ear infection, eosinophil count increased, urticaria, folliculitis, tonsillitis and rhinorrhea2. See Important Safety Information below, including Boxed Warnings for serious infections, mortality, malignancy, major adverse cardiovascular events and thrombosis, seen with JAK inhibitors for inflammatory conditions.

“It can be hard for people to fully appreciate how difficult AD can be and the tremendous impact it has on patients,” said Julie Block, President & CEO, National Eczema Association. “The chronic itch is difficult to cope with and related sleep issues can be exhausting. Many patients and their dermatologists are looking for additional options to meet current unmet needs in the management of AD. The approval of Opzelura is exciting news, and we welcome a new treatment option for our community.”

AD is a chronic skin disease affecting more than 21 million people aged 12 years and older in the U.S. and is characterized by inflammation and itch3. Signs and symptoms include irritated and itchy skin that can cause red lesions that may ooze and crust. People with AD are also more susceptible to bacterial, viral and fungal infections.

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Targeted drug can ‘diminish the suffering’ of myelofibrosis

Investigators further found that pacritinib could be used safely in patients with myelofibrosis who have thrombocytopenia, a life-threating loss of blood platelets that can lead to deadly bleeding. The only currently approved therapy for myelofibrosis   ruxolitinib   is not recommended in patients who have severe thrombocytopenia.
Pacritinib skeletal.svg Pacritinib Ruxolitinib2DACS.svg Ruxolitinib

Ruben A. Mesa, M.D., chair of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will present these results at a press conference held during the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago.

"Use of pacritinib can alleviate the burden and diminish the suffering that this cancer causes," says Dr. Mesa. "For many of the patients who used it, pacritinib is a very good drug. The agent was significantly superior to other medical treatments.

"It is too early to know if pacritinib has an impact on survival, but that is clearly our expectation," he adds.

Mayo researchers led by Dr. Mesa were also part of a phase 2 trial that found pacritinib offered significant benefit in treating the disorder.

Myelofibrosis is a chronic bone-marrow disorder that can lead to lowering of blood counts, scarring in the bone marrow, severe symptoms and enlargement of the spleen. Myelofibrosis can be life threatening for afflicted patients because of the debilitation the disease causes and/or progression to acute leukemia, Dr. Mesa says.

Myelofibrosis is one of three blood cancers classified as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), and MPN affects about 350,000 people in the U.S., he says.
In this study, two-thirds of the 327 patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis were treated with pacritinib. The other one-third were treated with best available therapy (BAT), but were able to cross over to use of pacritinib if their cancer was largely nonresponsive. BAT was chosen by the patient's physician, but did not include ruxolitinib because many patients were not eligible for it due to existing thrombocytopenia.

Pacritinib, an oral drug, is known as a JAK2/FLT3 inhibitor. JAK2 is a protein that acts like an on-off growth switch in blood cells.

"The JAK2 pathway is abnormally turned on in patients, which leads to this chronic leukemia. This drug turns off that switch," Dr. Mesa says.

PERSIST-1 investigators found that medium duration of treatment on the study was 16-plus months, and that by six months, spleen size was reduced in 25 percent of evaluable patients treated with pacritinib compared to 6 percent in the BAT group. Almost 80 percent of BAT patients crossed over to use of pacritinib, and 21 percent of all pacritinib patients had achieved a reduction in spleen volume of 35 percent or more. Symptoms of the cancer were reduced in more than 46 percent of pacritinib-treated patients compared to 9 percent in patients given BAT.

Saturday, March 3, 2012

New Drug, Ruxolitinib May Help Fight Rare Bone Marrow Disorder

In continuation of my update on ruxolitinib

New Drug May Help Fight Rare Bone Marrow Disorder: WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 -- Two new studies confirm that the new drug ruxolitinib can help people with the rare bone marrow disorder called myelofibrosis.
While the drug, marketed in the United States under the brand name Jakafi, won't cure...

Saturday, January 25, 2020

FDA Approves Inrebic (fedratinib) for the Treatment of Patients With Myelofibrosis


Fedratinib structure.svg

Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ: CELG)  announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of  Inrebic (fedratinib) for the treatment of adult patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis.1
“The approval of Inrebic is another important milestone for Celgene and underscores our commitment to people living with blood cancers,” said Jay Backstrom, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer for Celgene. “We are excited to provide Inrebic as a new treatment option that may be used in patients with myelofibrosis, including patients previously treated with ruxolitinib.”
“Myelofibrosis can cause patients to suffer in many ways, including experiencing debilitating symptoms,” said Ruben Mesa, M.D., FACP, Director of the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio Cancer Center MD Anderson. “There has not been a new treatment approved for this disease in nearly a decade. With Inrebic, physicians and patients now have another option available for myelofibrosis.”
The Inrebic development program consisted of multiple studies (including JAKARTA and JAKARTA2) in 608 patients who received more than one dose (ranging from 30 mg to 800 mg),1 of whom 459 had myelofibrosis,1 including 97 previously treated with ruxolitinib.1 The JAKARTA study evaluated the efficacy and safety of once-daily oral doses of Inrebic compared with placebo in patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk, primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis who were previously untreated with a JAK inhibitor, had enlarged spleens (a condition known as splenomegaly), and had a platelet count of ≥50 x 109/L (median baseline platelet count was 214 x 109/L; 16% <100 x 109/L and 84% ≥100 x 109/L).1,2 In the JAKARTA study, spleen volume was reduced by 35% or greater, when assessed from baseline to the end of cycle 6 (week 24), with a 4-week follow-up scan, in 37% (35 of 96) of patients treated with INREBIC 400 mg versus 1% (1 of 96) of patients who received placebo (p<0.0001).1 INREBIC also improved the Total Symptom Score as measured by the modified Myelofibrosis Symptoms Assessment Form (MFSAF) v2.0 diary2 (night sweats, itching, abdominal discomfort, early satiety, pain under ribs on left side, bone or muscle pain) by 50% or greater when assessed from baseline to the end of cycle 6 in 40% of (36 of 89) patients treated with 400 mg, versus 9% (7 of 81) of patients who received placebo (p<0.0001).1
Inrebic has a Boxed Warning for serious and fatal encephalopathy, including Wernicke’s. Serious encephalopathy was reported in 1.3% (8 of 608) of patients treated with Inrebic in clinical trials and 0.16% (1 of 608) of the cases were fatal. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a neurologic emergency resulting from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Thiamine levels should be assessed in all patients prior to starting Inrebic, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated.1 Do not start Inrebic in patients with thiamine deficiency; replete thiamine prior to treatment initiation. If encephalopathy is suspected, immediately discontinue Inrebic and initiate parenteral thiamine. Monitor until symptoms resolve or improve and thiamine levels normalize.
In the JAKARTA study, serious adverse reactions occurred in 21% of patients treated with Inrebic 400 mg once daily (n=96), with the most common (≥2%) being cardiac failure (5%) and anemia (2%).1 Fatal adverse reactions of cardiogenic shock occurred in 1% of patients.1 Permanent discontinuation due to an adverse reaction occurred in 14% of patients. The most frequent reasons for permanent discontinuation in ≥2% of patients receiving Inrebic included cardiac failure (3%), thrombocytopenia, myocardial ischemia, diarrhea, and increased blood creatinine (2% each).1
Dosage interruptions due to an adverse reaction during the randomized treatment period occurred in 21% of patients who received Inrebic. Adverse reactions requiring dosage interruption in >3% of patients who received Inrebic included diarrhea and nausea. Dosage reductions due to an adverse reaction during the randomized treatment period occurred in 19% of patients who received Inrebic. Adverse reactions requiring dosage reduction in >2% of patients who received Inrebic included anemia (6%), diarrhea (3%), vomiting (3%), and thrombocytopenia (2%).
“Inrebic is a much-welcomed new treatment for the myelofibrosis community,” said Ann Brazeau, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, MPN Advocacy and Education International. “This FDA approval marks an important milestone for people living with myelofibrosis as we embark on making greater strides in the diagnosis, understanding and treatment of this disease.”

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Fedratinib
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedratinib

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

U.S. FDA Grants Priority Review for Fedratinib New Drug Application in Myelofibrosis

Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG)   announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company’s New Drug Application (NDA) for fedratinib and granted a Priority Review. Fedratinib is a highly selective JAK2 inhibitor intended for the treatment of patients with myelofibrosis, a serious bone marrow disorder that disrupts the body’s normal production of blood cells.1 Under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act, the FDA has set its action date as Sept. 3, 2019.
  Fedratinib.png
“The acceptance of the NDA and granting of Priority Review for fedratinib represent the first potential new treatment option after many years for patients affected by myelofibrosis.” said Jay Backstrom, M.D., Chief Medical Officer for Celgene. “Patients with myelofibrosis, including the number who are ineligible for or failed existing therapy continues to increase, representing a well-defined unmet medical need. We believe fedratinib can play an important role in the treatment of myelofibrosis and we look forward to working with the FDA as the review process advances.”
The NDA for fedratinib is based on results from a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial (JAKARTA)in patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis, as well as a single-arm, open-label phase 2 trial (JAKARTA2) in patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis previously exposed to ruxolitinib, the only FDA-approved treatment for the disease. Results of these two trials have been previously published in peer-reviewed journals. The FDA has also provided fedratinib Orphan Drug designation for the treatment of secondary and primary myelofibrosis.
Celgene also plans to evaluate fedratinib in combination with luspatercept.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedratinib
https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Tg-101348#section=Structures