Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Berries. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Berries. Sort by date Show all posts

Monday, May 7, 2012

Berries, Tea May Cut Men’s Odds for Parkinson’s Disease..


In continuation of my update on Flavonoids...

Regularly consumption of food and drink rich in substances called flavonoids, such as berries, apples, tea and red wine, can lower a man’s risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by 40 percent, new research suggests.

  “For total flavonoids, the beneficial result was only in men. But, berries are protective in both men and women,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Xiang Gao, a research scientist at the Harvard School of Public Health and an associate epidemiologist at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“Berries could be a neuroprotective agent. People can include berries in their regular diet. There are no harmful effects from berry consumption, and they lower the risk of hypertension too,” Gao added.

For the study, the researchers reviewed nutrition and health data from almost 50,000 men enrolled in the Health Professional Follow-Up Study and more than 80,000 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study.

The researchers looked at dietary intake of five major flavonoid sources: tea, berries, apples, orange juice and red wine.

Over 20 to 22 years of follow-up, 805 people developed Parkinson’s disease — 438 men and 367 women.

When researchers compared those who ate the most flavonoids with those who ate the least, they found that only men saw a statistically significant benefit, lowering their risk of Parkinson’s by 40 percent.

Gao said it wasn’t clear why only men benefited from the extra flavonoid intake, but he noted that other studies have also found differences between men and women. Gao said it’s not clear if there’s a biological mechanism causing these differences, or another factor.

But, when the researchers looked at the dietary compounds individually, it was clear that berries could benefit both men and women, lowering the risk of Parkinson’s disease by about 25 percent for those who had at least two servings of berries a week.

Gao said that anthocyanins protect the cells from oxidative damage and they also have an anti-inflammatory effect, which may be how berries help to reduce Parkinson’s risk.

The study findings should be interpreted cautiously because the participants were mostly white professionals, and the results might not apply to other ethnic groups. Also, recollections of dietary intake may be faulty, and it’s possible that other properties of fruits and vegetables might have influenced the results, the authors said.

But, he added, it’s important for people to realize that this research isn’t applicable to people who already have the disease.

He also said it will be important to confirm these findings in other studies and learn the mechanism of how berries and other flavonoids appear to offer some protection against Parkinson’s disease.


Thursday, May 3, 2012

Eating more berries may reduce cognitive decline in the elderly

In continuation of my update on berries

Eating more berries may reduce cognitive decline in the elderly: Blueberries and strawberries, which are high in flavonoids, appear to reduce cognitive decline in older adults according to a new study. The study results suggest that cognitive aging could be delayed by up to 2.5 years in elderly who consume greater amounts of the flavonoid-rich berries.

Friday, April 6, 2012

Berries, Tea May Cut Men's Odds for Parkinson's: Study


In continuation of my update on the benefits of   berries, apple, tea...

Berries, Tea May Cut Men's Odds for Parkinson's: Study:  - Regularly consumption of food and drink rich in substances called flavonoids, such as berries, apples, tea and red wine, can lower a man's risk of developing Parkinson's disease by 40 percent, new research suggests.

Monday, January 17, 2011

Bioactive Compounds (anthocyanins) in Berries Can Reduce High Blood Pressure


We have already seen the benefits of anthocyanins, and also how useful the blue berries are. Now the researchers from University of East Anglia (UEA) and Harvard University, have further substantiated the usefulness of blue berries. As per the claim by the researchers eating blueberries can guard against high blood pressure.

The new findings show that bioactive compounds in blueberries called anthocyanins offer protection against hypertension. Compared with those who do not eat blueberries, those eating at least one serving a week reduce their risk of developing the condition by 10 per cent.

Anthocyanins (see structure) belong to the bioactive family of compounds called flavonoids and are found in high amounts in blackcurrants, raspberries, aubergines, blood orange juice and blueberries. Other flavonoids are found in many fruits, vegetables, grains and herbs. The flavonoids present in tea, fruit juice, red wine and dark chocolate are already known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

During the study, 35,000 participants developed hypertension. Dietary information identified tea as the main contributor of flavonoids, with apples, orange juice, blueberries, red wine, and strawberries also providing important amounts. When the researchers looked at the relation between individual subclasses of flavonoids and hypertension, they found that participants consuming the highest amounts of anthocyanins (found mainly in blueberries and strawberries in this US-based population) were eight per cent less likely to be diagnosed with hypertension than those consuming the lowest amounts. The effect was even stronger in participants under 60.

The effect was stronger for blueberry rather than strawberry consumption. Compared to people who ate no blueberries, those eating at least one serving of blueberries per week were 10 per cent less likely to become hypertensive.

"Our findings are exciting and suggest that an achievable dietary intake of anthocyanins may contribute to the prevention of hypertension," said lead author Prof Aedin Cassidy of the Department of Nutrition at UEA's Medical School".......


Monday, January 21, 2013

Monday, August 1, 2011

When Having the Blues is a Good Thing: Blueberries & Cancer Prevention

In continuation of my up date on the usefulness of blue berries.

Now researchers from the Department of Nutrition Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, lead by Laura Newton have come up with another interesting finding about blue berries, i.e., as little as a cup a day can help prevent cell damage linked to cancer.

As per the claim by the researchers, free radicals, atoms that contain an odd number of electrons and are highly reactive, can cause cellular damage, one of the factors in the development of cancer; many believe a diet filled with fruits and vegetables may help reduce the risk. 

Lead researcher says
"Studies suggest that antioxidants may help prevent the free-radical damage associated with cancer"

Researchers add that, Blueberries also are rich in vitamin C, which helps the immune system and can help the body to absorb iron. "Vitamin C also helps to keep blood vessels firm, offering protection from bruising. Blueberry juice and other products may be nutritious but often contain less fiber than the whole fruit, and added sugar or corn syrup may decrease their nutritional value. Consuming fresh, raw blueberries provides the most benefits; the average serving size of raw blueberries is one cup, which contains about 80 calories...

More...

Saturday, January 2, 2021

Cow's Milk Intake While Breastfeeding May Cut Child Food Allergies

In continuation of my update on cow milk

Children whose mothers drink more cow's milk during breastfeeding are at a lower risk for developing food allergies, according to a study recently published in Nutrients.

Mia Stråvik, from Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and colleagues compared the dietary intake of 508 pregnant and lactating women, validated the data with biomarkers of fatty acid proportions from breast milk and erythrocytes, and related these data to physician-diagnosed allergy in the offspring at 12 months of age.

The researchers found that an increased maternal intake of cow's milk during lactation was associated with a lower prevalence of physician-diagnosed food allergy by 12 months of age. This association was confirmed with biomarkers (fatty acids: pentadecanoic acid and heptadecanoic acid) in the maternal blood and breast milk. There was a higher prevalence of atopic eczema seen at 12 months of age among mothers with a higher intake of fruit and berries during lactation.

"One hypothesis is that cow's milk contains something that activates the child's immune system and helps it to develop tolerance. This as-yet unknown cause could be found in the fat of the milk or in its protein content," a coauthor said in a statement. "But it could also be the case that the milk itself is neutral in relation to the immune system. Then it might be more simply a matter of a higher intake of milk fats leading to a relatively lower intake of polyunsaturated fats. This would help, because we believe high levels of polyunsaturated fat in a mother's diet can counteract the maturation of a child's immune system at an early age."

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Eating blueberries every day could help decrease blood pressure

In continuation of my update on blueberries

A new study published in the Journal of Gerontology Series A has found that eating 200g of blueberries every day for a month can lead to an improvement in blood vessel function and a decrease in systolic blood pressure in healthy people.

Image result for blueberries

Researchers from King's College London studied 40 healthy volunteers for one month. They were randomly given either a drink containing 200g of blueberries, or a matched control drink daily.
The team monitored chemicals in volunteers' blood and urine as well as their blood pressure and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery: a measure of how the artery widens when blood flow increases, which is considered a sensitive biomarker of cardiovascular disease risk.
In a further study, researchers compared the effects of a blueberry drink with those of purified anthocyanins, a type of phytochemical responsible for the blue, red, pink and purple colour of some fruits and vegetables such as berries and red grapes. They also compared this with control drinks containing either similar levels of fiber, mineral or vitamins found in blueberries.
They found that:
  • Effects on blood vessel function were seen two hours after consumption of the blueberry drinks and were sustained for one month even after an overnight fast.
  • Over the course of the month, blood pressure was reduced by 5mmHg. This is similar to what is commonly seen in studies using blood pressure lowering medication.
  • The drinks containing purified anthocyanins led to improvements in endothelial function. Endothelial cells act as a barrier between the blood or lymph and the surrounding body tissue, as well as playing key roles in blood clotting and regulating blood pressure.
  • Neither the control drink, the control with fiber or the control with minerals and vitamins had a significant effect on FMD at two and six hours after consumption.
Lead researcher Dr Ana Rodriguez-Mateos from the Department of Nutritional Sciences at King's College London said: "Although it is best to eat the whole blueberry to get the full benefit, our study finds that the majority of the effects can be explained by anthocyanins.
"If the changes we saw in blood vessel function after eating blueberries every day could be sustained for a person's whole life, it could reduce their risk of developing cardiovascular disease by up to 20%."
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/news/news-article?id=af4e7b3e-2c7d-4d8f-ae9e-fe6d1014d0eb


Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Flavonoids may slow lung function decline due to aging

In continuation of my update on Flvonoids





Previous research has shown that the plant-produced chemicals known as flavonoids have beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Anthocyanins, the type of flavonoid investigated in the current study, have been detected in lung tissue shortly after being ingested, and in animals models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The plant chemicals appear to reduce mucus and inflammatory secretions.

However, "the epidemiological evidence on the association between flavonoids and   is very scant," said lead study author Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Human Nutrition Division of the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. "So we wanted to investigate whether dietary intake and anthocyanins are associated with lung function decline in middle-age adults."
The researchers analyzed data from 463 adults (average age: 44) who participated in the second and third European Community Respiratory Health Surveys from 2002 to 2012. Those included in the current study completed a dietary questionnaire and underwent spirometry at enrollment and upon follow-up. A common lung function test, spirometry measures the amount of air that a person can forcefully exhale in one second (FEV1), the total amount of air a person can exhale after taking a deep breath (FVC) and the ratio of the two, FEV1/FVC. Participants were then grouped into quartiles based on the amount of anthocyanins they consumed.
The study found individuals in the highest, compared to the lowest, quartile of  intake had:
  • a slower rate of annual decline in FEV1 than those in the lowest quartile: -9.8 milliliters per year (mL/yr) vs. -18.9 mL/yr.
  • a slower rate of annual decline in FVC than those in the lowest quartile: -9.8 mL/yr vs. -22.2 mL/yr.
  • a slower rate of annual decline in FEV1/FVC: -0.02/yr.
The researchers also analyzed the association between anthocyanin consumption and lung function in smokers, those who had never smoked and those who quit. The association between high consumption of the flavonoids and reduced lung function decline appeared to be stronger among both never smokers and those who had quit than in the general study population. Among smokers, the study did not find an association between anthocyanin intake and lung function.
The study adjusted for a wide range of factors, including characteristics of participants' diets, gender, height, body mass index and socioeconomic status. Another strength of the study was its inclusion of participants from two countries, Norway and England. The study was limited by its relatively small size and the fact that diets were self-reported.
"Our study suggests that the general population could benefit from consuming more fruits rich in these flavonoids like berries, particularly those who have given up smoking or have never smoked, Dr. Larsen said. "For smokers, quitting remains the best thing they can do to protect their health."
The first European Community Respiratory Health Survey began in 1990 in response to a worldwide increase in asthma prevalence. The scope of the surveys has expanded to include information about the associations between behavioral and environmental factors that might also affect the development of COPD.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Animal studies examine role of raspberry products in weight management and motor function

Image result for red raspberries Image result for red raspberries


The latest issue of the Journal of Berry Research includes two new animal studies that investigate the effects of raspberry consumption in helping to support healthy weight and motor function (strength, balance and coordination). Future studies are needed to support the results found in these studies.

One-cup of frozen red raspberries has only 80 calories, is an excellent source of vitamin C, and provides nine grams of fiber (more fiber than any other berry). Like most berries, raspberries are a low-glycemic index food. Raspberries contain phytochemicals, such as ellagic acid, quercetin, gallic acid, cyanidins, pelargonidins, catechins, kaempferol and salicylic acid.

Animal and cellular studies examining how phytochemicals may work at the molecular level suggest that certain phytochemicals may help slow age-related declines. Age is the number one risk factor for many chronic diseases. Likewise, obesity is a major risk factor for chronic disease. These latest animal studies examine two important areas of health where raspberry products may play a role in weight management and also support motor function.

OBESITY

An animal study conducted by researchers at Oregon State University found that when added to a high-fat, high-sucrose diet, raspberry products and raspberry phytochemicals were found to significantly decrease weight gain associated with a high-fat, high calorie diet. Raspberry juice and raspberry puree concentrates were provided at 10% of total energy (the equivalent of 200 calories in a 2,000 calorie diet), and a combination of ellagic acid and raspberry ketone were provided at 0.2% weight/weight.

In the study, 76 male mice were divided into the following diets: a low-fat control group (10% calories from fat), a high-fat control group (45% calories from fat) and seven "high-fat treatment" groups that included a high-fat diet plus either raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, raspberry ketone and a combination of equal parts of ellagic acid and raspberry ketone.

"The addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate and the combination of ellagic acid plus raspberry ketones to the high fat diet significantly reduced weight gain observed in the high-fat fed mice," said Dr. Neil Shay, Principal Investigator. "In the case of the high-fat and raspberry juice concentrate diet, weight gain was reduced to a level that was statistically equivalent to the weight gain of the low-fat fed mice, despite the fact that all high-fat fed groups consumed the same amount of calories and more energy than the low-fat control group throughout the study."

The researchers concluded that the intake of a reasonable level of some raspberry food products may influence some of the metabolic consequences of consuming a high-fat, high-calorie diet in the development of obesity in male mice.

"We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," said Dr. Shay.

MOTOR FUNCTION

Researchers from the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University evaluated the effectiveness of a red raspberry-supplemented diet on age-sensitive measures of learning, memory and motor performance in older rats.

In this 10-week study, red raspberry supplementation was found to significantly improve motor skills. Specifically, compared to rats fed a standard well-balanced diet, rats fed a diet supplemented with freeze-dried raspberry extract performed better on tests which measured psychomotor coordination and balance, as well as tests that measure muscle tone, strength, and stamina.

"These results may have important implications for healthy aging," said lead researcher Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Compound found in grapes, red wine may help prevent memory loss

In continuation of my update on resveratrol
A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research published by a faculty member in the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine.

Ashok K. Shetty, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine and Director of Neurosciences at the Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has been studying the potential benefit of resveratrol, an antioxidant that is found in the skin of red grapes, as well as in red wine, peanuts and some berries.
Resveratrol has been widely touted for its potential to prevent heart disease, but Shetty and a team that includes other researchers from the health science center believe it also has positive effects on the hippocampus, an area of the brain that is critical to functions such as memory, learning and mood.
Because both humans and animals show a decline in cognitive capacity after middle age, the findings may have implications for treating memory loss in the elderly. Resveratrol may even be able to help people afflicted with severe neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.
In a study published online Jan. 28 in Scientific Reports, Shetty and his research team members reported that treatment with resveratrol had apparent benefits in terms of learning, memory and mood function in aged rats.
"The results of the study were striking," Shetty said. "They indicated that for the control rats who did not receive resveratrol, spatial learning ability was largely maintained but ability to make new spatial memories significantly declined between 22 and 25 months. By contrast, both spatial learning and memory improved in the resveratrol-treated rats."
Shetty said neurogenesis (the growth and development of neurons) approximately doubled in the rats given resveratrol compared to the control rats. The resveratrol-treated rats also had significantly improved microvasculature, indicating improved blood flow, and had a lower level of chronic inflammation in the hippocampus.
"The study provides novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age can help improve memory and mood function in old age," Shetty said.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Cancer Fighting Foods.............

Cancer Fighting Foods:




How can food fight cancer, you ask? In many, many ways! Certain healthy foods can lower your risk for cancer by repairing damaged cells and protect sensitive skin. Incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet is a relatively small lifestyle change that can really reduce your cancer risk.

Orange Juice:



Oranges are high in folate, and recent research suggests that people with low levels of folate are more likely have mutations occur in their DNA, which can lead to mutated cancer cells.  Leafy greens, like spinach and Brussels sprouts, are also high in folate. In recent research, men who consumed their daily suggested intake of folate were able to decrease their risk for pancreatic cancer by 50-percent.

Milk:

We’ve all heard that calcium is important for healthy bones, but milk is also high in vitamin D, another nutrient that is linked to combating cancer—researchers suggest that vitamin D helps stop the growth of cancerous cells. In fact, it has been shown to significantly decrease the risk of breast cancer.


Beans:
The more you eat, the more you—well, the more you decrease your risk for cancer.  Beans, in addition to being high in protein and fiber (great for vegetarian diet), are also high in antioxidants that are key in the fight against cancer.  Antioxidants protect your cells against free radicals—free radicals, which can come from activities like smoking, cause damage to cells, leading to cancer and other complications.


Other foods that are high in antioxidants: Berries, cruciferous vegetables (think broccoli and cabbage), potatoes and nuts. A good general rule of thumb is to eat fruits and veggies that have a lot of color to them, as they usually contain the highest amount antioxidants.

Salad :


Your mom was right—you really should eat up all of your leafy greens .  Leafy greens (like spinach and kale) contain a substance called chlorophyllin, which can help fight cancer—it works by blocking toxins. People who consume more leafy greens show lower rates of stomach cancer.

And A Glass of Wine!


Grapes and wine contain resveratrol, which is another substance that slows the growth of cancerous cells. It does so by limiting growth and acts as a catalyst for apoptosis (a cancer cell death).  In addition to it’s anti-carcinogenic properties, it also helps prevent Alzheimer’s and diabetes. More importantly (ha-ha), it’s also been linked to anti-aging properties: it helps stimulate the production of SIRT1, a serum that helps slow the aging process.

So, there you have it; your first steps to prevent cancer (along with SPF and quitting smoking) are right here.  A healthier diet with more fruits and veggies will do more than lower your risk of cancer; it will change your quality of life. And, if eating healthy is not your thing, start with small changes, and build from there!


Virginia Cunningham is a freelance writer from Los Angeles whose writing covers a range of health topics, including holistic alternatives, healthy cooking and personal fitness. She not only includes these cancer-fighting foods into her diet, but she enjoys them as well!