Monday, November 30, 2009

S-methylmethionine (Vitamin U) as antiulcer agent .......

About S-methylthionine :

S-Methylmethionine, or S-methyl-L-methionine, is a derivative of methionine In plants, it is produced from methionine by the enzyme methionine S-methyltransferase. S-Methyl- methionine is sometimes called vitamin U in naturopathic medicine, but it is not recognized as a vitamin by mainstream nutrition science. Methionine in itself has not been demonstrated as effective for treating peptic and duodenal ulcers. Its proponents claim that sources of methionine are limited, or claim it can be found only in raw cabbage; however, these claims are incorrect. Methionine is a common amino acid found in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and legumes.

More interesting results by the researchers from the Stanford University, have further substantiated the claim that it can be used to treat peptic and duodenal ulcers.

Acetaminophen is a pain reliever present in many over-the-counter cold and flu medicines. It is broken down, or metabolized, in the body into byproducts , one of which can be very toxic to the liver. At normal, therapeutic levels, this byproduct is easily deactivated when it binds to a naturally occurring, protective molecule called glutathione. But the body's glutathione stores are finite, and are quickly depleted when the recommended doses of acetaminophen are exceeded. Acetaminophen overdose is the most common cause of liver transplantation and the only effective antidote is an unpalatable compound called NAC that can induce nausea and vomiting, and must be administered as soon as possible after the overdose.

As per the claim by the authors, an enzyme called Bhmt2 helped to generate more glutathione. Bhmt2 works by converting the diet-derived molecule S-methylmethionine, or SMM, into methionine, which is subsequently converted in a series of steps into glutathione. The researchers confirmed the importance of the pathway by showing that SMM conferred protection against acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity only in strains of mice in which the Bhmt2 pathway was functional.

By administering SMM, which is found in every flowering plant and vegetable, we were able to prevent a lot of the drug’s toxic effect,” said Peltz. He and his colleagues are now working to set up clinical trials at Stanford to see whether it will have a similar effect in humans. In the meantime, though, he cautions against assuming that dosing oneself with SMM will protect against acetaminophen overdose....

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