Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Topiramate. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Topiramate. Sort by date Show all posts

Monday, June 19, 2017

Newer Epilepsy Drugs May Be Safer During Pregnancy

In continuation of my update on  levetiracetam and topiramate 
Topiramate structure.svg  Topiramate   Levetiracetam.svg Levetiracetam 


Women who take the new epilepsy drugs levetiracetam and topiramate during pregnancy don't run the risk of harming their infant's mental development, British researchers report.
But the commonly prescribed anti-seizure drug valproate was linked with lower IQs in children, especially when taken at higher doses, researchers say.
"The treatment of epilepsy in women who are considering a pregnancy or are pregnant involves optimizing the health of the mother as well as keeping the risk to the fetus as low as possible," said lead researcher Rebecca Bromley, a research fellow at the Institute for Human Development at the University of Manchester.
In the study, children exposed to levetiracetam (Keppra) or topiramate (Topamax) in the womb did not differ from children not exposed to these drugs. And they had better outcomes than the children exposed to valproate (Depakote) in terms of their IQ, thinking and language skills, Bromley said.
"These data can be used by doctors and women to help them make their decisions about which medication is best for them," she added.
For the study, Bromley and her colleagues used the U.K. Epilepsy and Pregnancy Register to identify 171 women with epilepsy who had a child between 5 and 9 years old. During their pregnancy, 42 of the women took levetiracetam, 27 took topiramate, and 47 took valproate, the researchers said.
Bromley's team compared the women with epilepsy with 55 women who did not take epilepsy drugs during pregnancy. The children had their IQ measured and took tests on verbal and nonverbal comprehension and how fast they could process visual information.
The researchers found that children of women who took levetiracetam or topiramate did not have lower IQs or other thinking-skill problems, compared with kids of mothers who did not take these drugs, no matter what dose of these drugs were taken.
Children whose mothers took valproate, however, had the lowest IQs of the study, Bromley said. These kids scored, on average, 11 points lower on the IQ test.
Among children whose mothers took valproate, 19 percent had IQs lower than the average score of 100, compared with 6 percent among kids whose mothers did not take any epilepsy drugs during pregnancy, the researchers found.
Because the registry the researchers used does not include all women with epilepsy, the findings might not apply to all women with the conditions, Bromley noted. She also said that topiramate, one of the newer drugs, has been associated with an increased risk of birth defects, such as cleft lip and palate.
The study was funded by Epilepsy Research U.K. and the report was published online Aug. 31 in the journalNeurology.
Dr. Ian Miller is a pediatric neurologist and medical director of the comprehensive epilepsy program at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in Miami. "This study means that we have a little bit more information for women who become pregnant while taking epilepsy medicines," he said.
The exact risks of taking any medicine during pregnancy are very difficult to know, he added.
"As a result, many questions remain," Miller said. "But this study gives doctors a reason to choose topiramate or levetiracetam, which did not show a measurable effect on the child's development, rather than valproate, which did."
Women who are on valproate because they already tried other medications and "moved on because those medications were less effective, will face some difficult decisions," he said.
"Any woman of childbearing potential should discuss this aspect of their medical management with their doctor, especially in light of these new findings," Miller added.

Tuesday, December 14, 2021

FDA Approves Eprontia (topiramate) Oral Solution for Epilepsy and Preventive Treatment of Migraine

 In continuation of my update on topiramate...




Azurity Pharmaceuticals, Inc.announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Eprontia™ (topiramate) oral solution, 25 mg/mL.

“Our ability to address each patient’s needs, with a tailored approach and a proven therapy, is transformative for patients, caregivers, and the healthcare professionals (HCPs) who treat them,” said Amit Patel, Chairman and CEO of Azurity Pharmaceuticals. “Eprontia’s ready-to-use liquid formulation provides HCPs a therapy that addresses an unmet medical need.”

Globally, an estimated 65 million people have epilepsy, and 1 billion suffer from migraine. In the United States, 1 in 26 people will develop epilepsy at some point during their lifetime and approximately 39 million people suffer from migraines.1,2 For HCPs working with patients suffering from serious neurological conditions, such as seizures associated with epilepsy and migraine headaches, Eprontia™ provides a ready to use liquid medication for patients, such as those who have trouble swallowing pills. Caregivers also may benefit from the ease of giving the medication.

“I am pleased that there will now be an FDA-approved liquid formulation of topiramate for patients who may require or prefer a liquid formulation,” said Michael C. Smith, MD, Director, Rush Epilepsy Center, and Professor, Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center. “Clinical challenges have existed for years for clinicians looking for a high quality, predictable formulation option of topiramate to effectively meet the varied needs of patients and caregivers.”

More..





Thursday, December 31, 2009

Combination of Phentermine & Topiramate for obesity treatment......

We know that Phentermine (see structure) is  an appetite suppressant of the  amphetamine and phenethylamine class. It is approved as an appetite suppressant to help reduce weight in obese patients. Its  usually used for short-term and in combination with exercise, diet and behavioral modification. Is typically prescribed for individuals, who are at increased medical risk because of their weight and works by helping to release certain chemicals in the brain that control appetite.  

Mode of action : Phentermine, in doses clinically used, works on the hypothalamus portion of the brain to release norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter or chemical messenger that signals a fight-or-flight response, reducing hunger. Phentermine works outside the brain as well to release epinephrine or adrenaline causing fat cells to break down stored fat, but the principal basis of efficacy is hunger-reduction. At high doses, phentermine releases serotonin and dopamine as well, but such doses are never used in clinical medicine.  


Topiramate (structure below), is a known anticonvulsant agent and  also  reported  for  the  treatment   of
SSRI-  induced weight gain in anxiety disorders. However a combination   of these two drugs (Phentermine & Topiramate) has been  tried by VIVUS, Inc. and has submitted New Drug Application (NDA)   to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval of Qnexa (Phentermine & Topiramate combination) - its investigational drug for the treatment of obesity, including weight loss and maintenance of weight loss, in patients who are obese or overweight with co-morbidities such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or central adiposity.

The NDA submission follows the successful completion of the phase 3 program for Qnexa, including the recently announced results from the two pivotal, year-long phase 3 studies (EQUIP and CONQUER). In these trials, patients treated with all three doses of Qnexa achieved significant percent and categorical weight loss compared to placebo and met regulatory requirements for weight loss products as defined in the current FDA Guidance for Developing Products for Weight Management. Patients treated with Qnexa also had significant dose-related improvements in a variety of secondary endpoints including reductions in cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Hope people with obesity, will breathe a sigh of relief in the near future....

Ref : http://ir.vivus.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=433172

Friday, April 13, 2012

Weight loss pill Qnexa wins panel vote and awaits approval

We know that, The combination of the drugs phentermine (see structure-1) and topiramate (structure -2) (trade name Qnexa) is an investigational medication for the treatment ofobesity and related conditions such as type 2 diabetes and has been found to lower blood pressure and cholesterol.  Qnexa is being developed by Vivus, a California pharmaceutical company.  Phentermine is an appetite suppressant and stimulant of the amphetamine andphenethylamine class. Topiramate is an anticonvulsant that has weight loss side effects.

Structure 1
Structure-2
       
Weight loss pill Qnexa wins panel vote and awaits approval: The drug was rejected in a 10-6 vote the first time it came before a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel, in 2010, due to safety concerns. However when the medication returned for another review in February, the advisory committee gave it near-unanimous approval (20-2). Because the FDA often follows the advisory panel's advice, Qnexa is likely to get FDA approval, probably by mid-April.
                                                                                                                       

Friday, January 15, 2010

Phentermine & Topiramate combination (Qnexa®) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)....

In continuation of my update on Qnexa® (combination of Phentermine & Topiramate), a drug by VIVUS, Inc., I found this info really interesting  to share with.

VIVUS, Inc on 7. January 201, announced positive results from a phase 2 study evaluating the safety and efficacy of Qnexa®, an investigational drug, for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). VIVUS recently completed phase 3 development of Qnexa for the treatment of obesity and submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) to the FDA for that indication. The OSA- study announced  demonstrated statistically significant improvement in the apnea/hypopnea index ("AHI" - a measure of the severity of sleep apnea) in patients with OSA treated with Qnexa for 28 weeks.

OSA is a sleep-related breathing disorder that involves a decrease or complete halt in airflow despite an ongoing effort to breathe. OSA is associated with an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes, stroke, sudden cardiac death and all-cause mortality. Currently, there are no approved pharmacologic treatments for OSA and current treatment approaches are limited to devices or surgery, so if approved by the FDA, Qnexa®  not only reduce the weight  but also significantly improve sleep apnea.

Ref : http://ir.vivus.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=434708

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Diet Drugs: Which Ones Work?

Any of the prescription weight-loss drugs on the market can help obese people shed pounds, although some seem more effective than others, a new study finds.
Currently, five drugs are approved in the United States for managing obesity. But little has been known about how they stack up against one another, said Dr. Siddharth Singh, the lead researcher on the new study.
The findings  based on more than 29,000 people in total show all five drugs can work. But people on certain drugs tended to be more successful, at least over one year.
Specifically, people using Qsymia (phentermine-topiramate) or Victoza (liraglutide) had the highest odds of shedding at least 5 percent of their initial weight. Those taking Xenical (orlistat) had the lowest odds.
Fentermina.svgphentermine ChemSpider 2D Image | liraglutide | C172H265N43O51liraglutide

Orlistat structure.svg orlistat Lorcaserin.svg lorcaserin

Bupropion and naltrexone.svg Bupropion/naltrexone 


However, there is no single drug that's "best" for everyone, stressed Singh, an assistant clinical professor at the University of California, San Diego.
He cautioned that his team's numbers are just averages across study groups. Plus, he said, the side effects of each medication vary, and that is an important factor in treatment decisions.
"Obesity treatment always needs to be personalized," Singh said.
Nikhil Dhurandhar, a spokesman for the Obesity Society, agreed that people respond differently to any given weight-loss drug.
"In general, if you give drug 'X,' there will be a wide variation in patients' responses," said Dhurandhar, who is also a professor of nutritional sciences at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. He wasn't involved in the study.
Some people will have "zero" weight loss   or even gain weight -- while others will see the pounds drop off, Dhurandhar said.
He also stressed that there is no such thing as a magic weight-loss pill.
"These drugs can help you eat less through effects on appetite," Dhurandhar explained. "But you have to change your diet and get regular exercise."
"Medications are supplements, not substitutes, to your efforts," he said.
For the study, Singh's team analyzed findings from 28 clinical trials testing the five approved drugs for obesity: Qsymia, Victoza and Xenical, along with Belviq (lorcaserin) and Contrave (naltrexone-bupropion).
On average, the researchers found, each drug worked better than a placebo in helping obese adults lose weight over a year. But certain medications seemed more effective than others.
People on Qsymia typically lost the most weight -- almost 20 pounds more, versus study patients given placebo pills. They were also nine times more likely to drop at least 5 percent of their initial weight, the researchers found.
People taking Xenical or Belviq tended to shed the fewest pounds -- 6 to 7 pounds more than placebo users. Contrave and Victoza patients typically lost 11 to 12 pounds more, compared with placebo.
But not everyone benefited. In studies of all of the drugs, Singh noted, a significant number of people dropped out because of side effects.
And those dropouts were more common with certain medications, the study found. People taking Contrave or Victoza were almost three times more likely to quit a trial over side effects, compared with placebo users. According to Victoza's maker, the drug can cause inflammation of the pancreas or kidney problems.
Just as people vary in their weight-loss success with any given drug, their risks of side effects will differ, too, Singh said.
He pointed to Contrave as an example. Because it contains the antidepressant bupropion, it carries a boxed warning about the potential risk of suicidal thoughts. So it might not be the best choice for someone with psychiatric conditions that could make them more vulnerable, Singh said.
Victoza, meanwhile, is an injection drug prescribed for controlling high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. So if a patient needs medication for diabetes as well as weight loss, Victoza might be a good option, Singh said.
Most of the medications have been approved only in the past few years, so one question is whether they maintain their effects over the long run, Singh said.
"We do need more long-term data," Dhurandhar agreed.
Still, he said, medications are an important option for managing obesity. And if one does not work, Dhurandhar added, he'd recommend trying another.