Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Small molecules stop cervical cancer virus assembling

Researchers in China have disrupted the life cycle of the leading cause of cervical cancer – the human papilloma virus – using a macrocyclic molecule called a pillarene. The team hope their findings will offer new prophylactic avenues against the virus.

The pillarene derivative, CP5A, was tested as it is known to have high water solubility and show selective binding towards basic amino acids, like l-Lysine, l-arginine and l-histidine. Because of these properties, CP5A binds to the exposed basic amino acids in protein L1, preventing pentamer formation, and therefore stopping the creation of viral particles.

The team hope to screen other small molecules to find inhibitors for more specific binding sites on the interface between L1 and L2. Their long term aim is to use one of these to produce a HPV vaccine.

Ref :!divAbstract

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