Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Research: Sunscreen provides 100% protection against skin cancer

Researchers found sunscreen provides 100 per cent protection against all three forms ofskin cancer: BCC (basal cell carcinoma); SCC (squamous cell carcinoma); and malignantmelanoma.
Lead researcher Dr Elke Hacker, from QUT's AusSun Research Lab, said sunscreen not only provided 100 per cent protection against the damage that can lead to skin cancer but it shielded the important p53 gene, a gene that works to prevent cancer.

"As soon as our skin becomes sun damaged, the p53 gene goes to work repairing that damage and thereby preventing skin cancer occurring.

"But over time if skin is burnt regularly the p53 gene mutates and can no longer do the job it was intended for - it no longer repairs sun damaged skin and without this protection skin cancers are far more likely to occur."

The study, published in the Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research journal, looked at the impact of sunlight on human skin, both with and without sunscreen, and found no evidence of UV-induced skin damage when proper application of sunscreen (SPF30+) had been applied to exposed area.

"Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer with research showing damage of melanocytes - the pigment-producing cells of the skin - after sun exposure plays a role in the development of skin cancer," Dr Hacker said.

Dr Hacker said the study, funded by Cancer Council Queensland, involved 57 people undergoing a series of skin biopsies to determine molecular changes to the skin before and after UV exposure and with and without sunscreen.

"Firstly we took small skin biopsies of people's unexposed skin. We then exposed two skin sites to a mild burning dose of UV light, one site was applied with sunscreen and the other was not. We again took biopsies of both sites.

"After 24 hours, we took another set of biopsies and compared the skin samples.
"What we found was that, after 24 hours where the sunscreen had been applied, there were no DNA changes to the skin and no impact on the p53 gene," she said. Dr Hacker said this was a significant finding.

"In Australia we have strong standards around sunscreens and their ability to protect against erythema (redness of skin)," Dr Hacker said.

2 comments:

Unknown said...

Ridiculous. Perhaps there was no detectable (by what method?) difference after 24 hrs, but that's hardly proof of "100% protection". An absurdly broad claim based on poor science.

dr.umesh l said...

Hello @unknown, why can't you mail the author at (http://www.uv.hlth.qut.edu.au/about-us/our-people.jsp)

elke.hacker@qut.edu.au
get more details if you want...