Wednesday, January 30, 2013

NIH clinical trial begins for treatment of rare, fatal neurological disorder, January 23, 2013 News Release - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

 We know that, Cyclodextrins (sometimes called cycloamyloses) are a family of compounds made up of sugar molecules bound together in a ring (cyclic oligosaccharides). Cyclodextrins are produced from starch by means of enzymatic conversion. They are used in food, pharmaceutical,drug delivery, and chemical industries, as well as agriculture and environmental engineering. Hydroxypropyl Beta Cyclodextrin (HPβCD) is the chief active compound found in Procter and Gamble's deodorizing product "Febreze" under the brand name "Clenzaire".Cyclodextrins are composed of 5 or more α-D-glucopyranoside units linked 1->4, as in amylose (a fragment of starch). The 5-membered macrocycle is not natural. Recently, the largest well-characterized cyclodextrin contains 32 1,4-anhydroglucopyranoside units, while as a poorly characterized mixture, at least 150-membered cyclic oligosaccharides are also known. Typical cyclodextrins contain a number of glucose monomers ranging from six to eight units in a ring, creating a cone shape.

A clinical trial to evaluate a drug candidate called cyclodextrin as a possible treatment for Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC), a rare and fatal genetic disease has already started on 23rd Jan, 2012. Scientists from the NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) will conduct the clinical trial at the NIH Clinical Center. Reaching this trial stage required collaboration among government, industry, patient advocacy groups and academic researchers.

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