Friday, January 4, 2013

Drug May Help Women Who Quit Smoking Avoid Weight Gain - Drugs.com MedNews

In continuation of my update on Naltrexone

We know that, Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. It is marketed in generic form as its hydrochloridesalt, naltrexone hydrochloride, and marketed under the trade names Revia andDepade. In some countries including the United States, a once-monthly extended-release injectable formulation is marketed under the trade name Vivitrol. Also in the US, Methylnaltrexone Bromide, a closely related drug, is marketed as Relistor, for the treatment of opioid induced constipation.

Naltrexone should not be confused with naloxone (which is used in emergency cases of overdose rather than for longer-term dependence control) nor nalorphine. Using naloxone in place of naltrexone can cause far worse withdrawal symptoms; conversely, using naltrexone in place of naloxone in an overdose can lead to insufficient opiate antagonism and fail to reverse the overdose.



1 comment:

Jamie Salcedo said...

Thank you for the news post, Dr. Umesh. My mother was finally convinced to stop smoking after her doctor explained about her weight gain. I remember when my sister used her for some EKG tech training we saw the effect her smoking did to her heart rate as well.