Monday, November 29, 2010

PARP inhibitor, MK-4827, shows anti-tumour activity in first trial in humans....



MK-4827 , (S)-2-(4-(piperidin-3-yl)phenyl)-2H-indazole-7-carboxamide hydrochloride.
A recent study claim that the new drug MK-4827 (see structure), that targets proteins responsible for helping cancer cells to repair damage to their DNA has shown promising anti-tumor activity in its first trial in humans. Some patients with a range of solid tumors, many of whom had been treated unsuccessfully for their cancer with other therapies, have seen their tumors shrink or stabilize for periods of between 46 days to more than a year.
Laboratory studies of the drug, MK-4827, have shown that it inhibits proteins called PARP1 and PARP2  (poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase). PARP is involved in a number of cellular processes and one of its important functions is to assist in the repair of single-strand breaks in DNA. As per the claim by the researchers, drug act by inhibiting the action of PARP, double-strand breaks occur, leading to cell death. Researchers add that tumors that are caused by a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are susceptible to cell death through PARP inhibition because correctly functioning BRCA genes assist in repairing double-strand DNA breaks via a process called homologous-recombination-dependent DNA repair, whereas mutated versions are unable to perform this role. Normal cells don't replicate as often as cancer cells and they still have homologous repair operating; this enables them to survive the inhibition of PARP and makes PARP a good target for anti-cancer therapy.
In a Phase I trial conducted at the H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center (Tampa Florida, USA), University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, USA) and the Royal Marsden Hospital (London, UK), MK-4827 was given to 59 patients (46 women, 13 men) with a range of solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), prostate cancer, sarcoma, melanoma and breast and ovarian cancers. Some patients had cancers caused by mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes, such as breast and ovarian cancer, but others had cancers that had arisen sporadically.
The researchers saw anti-tumor responses in both sporadic and BRCA1/2 mutation-associated cancers. Ten patients with breast and ovarian cancers had partial responses, with progression-free survival between 51-445 days, and seven of these patients are still responding to treatment. Four patients (two with ovarian cancer and two with NSCLC) had stable disease for between 130-353 days.

1 comment:

SANTU said...

Soon some drugs, targeting PARP enzyme, may come for cancer treatment on the market

Great article!!

http://chem-info.blogspot.com/